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Patriot Capt. William McClanahan, Sr.[1, 2]

Male 1741 - 1819  (77 years)


Personal Information    |    Media    |    Sources    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name William McClanahan 
    • Speculation of the two William McClanahans; William who married Sarah Nealey is often shown as the s/o Robert, the Founder, McClanahan. However Sarah Nealey McClanahan did not name a son, Robert, but first son is Elijah. We believe then, William McClanahan s/o Elijah McClanahan is the William who married Sarah Nealey. William, s/o Elijah was born 1741; William, s/o Robert is shown as born 1749/50.
    Title Patriot 
    Prefix Capt. 
    Suffix Sr. 
    Born 25 Dec 1741  Augusta County, Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 1819  Roanoke, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Wm. McClanahan, Sr., died about 1820, from amputation of the leg, rendered necessary by disease [likely diabetes] which began in the foot. His wife, the mother of all his children, survived him, and died about 1824. In person she was slender, and in old age suffered from palsy in the head. They both died in the old homestead and were buried in the old burying ground near by. This venerable cemetery was the only one within a radius of sixteen miles, as Mrs. il Betsy McClanahan " personally testified to Mrs. Colonel Thomas Lewis, and according to her memory, "the whole hill was covered with graves." Mrs. "Betsy McClanahan" personally testified to Mrs. Blanche White also, that a pine tree had grown up between the head and foot stones of the grave of her father-in law, Colonel Wm. McClanahan. Mrs. White remembers this tree. It was blown down, and a snag of its stump (root) may now (1894) be seen between these stones.

      After the death of Mrs. Wm. McClanahan, Sr.,[Sarah Nealey] the homestead was inherited by her grandson, Charles McClanahan, who sold it to William, son of James McClanahan, who sold it to Colonel J. R. Richardson, who sold it to Thomas Tosh, who
      sold it to Elijah McClanahan, son of Green and grandson of William, the senior. He [Elijah] afterwards (1860) bought the Big Spring mill on the place and removed a deed of trust that had long been on it. His widow, Emma S. McClanahan, bought it at the sale, and sold it to a land company in 1889.
    Person ID I19160  My Reynolds Line
    Last Modified 25 Oct 2019 

    Father Patriot Elijah McClanahan,   b. 1718, Antrim, Ulster Province, IRELAND Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 May 1794, Augusta County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years) 
    Mother Ann Ewing,   b. Est 1712, Antrim, Ulster Province, IRELAND Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1764, Staunton, Augusta County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 52 years) 
    Married 1727  IRELAND Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F7072  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Sarah Nealey/Neeley,   b. Abt 1748, Augusta County, Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1824, Roanoke, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 76 years) 
    Married 7 Mar 1769  Botetourt, Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Children of William McClanahan and Sarah Nealey:
      Elijah McClanahan
      Green McClanahan
      James McClanahan
      Jane McClanahan
      John McClanahan
      Mary Polly McClanahan
      Nancy McClanahan
      Samuel McClanahan
      Sarah McClanahan
      Thomas McClanahan
      Washington McClanahan
    Children 
    +1. Elijah McClanahan,   b. 20 Apr 1770, Botetourt, County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Dec 1857, Roanoke, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 87 years)
    +2. James of William McClanahan,   b. 10 Sep 1777, Prob. Roanoke, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1865, Roanoke, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 87 years)
    +3. John McClanahan,   b. 30 Apr 1780, Prob. Roanoke, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1814  (Age 33 years)
    +4. Green McClanahan,   b. 3 Oct 1782, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1820, Vinton, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 37 years)
    +5. Jane McClanahan,   b. 27 Nov 1774, Botetourt Co., Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt Mar 1846, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years)
     6. Mary 'Polly' McClanahan,   b. Est 1776, Augusta Co., Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 27 Nov 2020 
    Family ID F7112  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Documents
    Map of Part of Augusta County, Colony of Virginia 1755-1760; Shows Tinkling Spring Church and Fort Chiswell
    Map of Part of Augusta County, Colony of Virginia 1755-1760; Shows Tinkling Spring Church and Fort Chiswell
    Map_of_Augusta_County_1755-1760.jpg

    Headstones
    Memorial Plaque Revolutionary Soldiers Buried in Mason County, West Virginia  RobertMcClanahan, Andrew Lewis, Benjamin Lewis, Thomas Lewis, Alexander McClanahan, William, McClanahan, Capt. Jesse Van Bibber, Michael Van Bibber and others
    Memorial Plaque Revolutionary Soldiers Buried in Mason County, West Virginia RobertMcClanahan, Andrew Lewis, Benjamin Lewis, Thomas Lewis, Alexander McClanahan, William, McClanahan, Capt. Jesse Van Bibber, Michael Van Bibber and others
    19080RobertMcClanahan3.jpg

  • Sources 
    1. [S107] Family Histories, http://www.archive.org/stream/mcclanahans00whitgoog/mcclanahans00whitgoog_djvu.txt.
      Robert McClanahan came to Augusta County from Ireland. The time of his coming has not been certainly determined, but it was at an early day. His deed to three hundred and thirty-one acres of land by William Beverly, dated May 27, 1741, is on record in Orange Courthouse, Virginia. There was no clerk's office, in Augusta County, until 1745. His wife, Sarah Breckinridge, was daughter of Alexander Breckinridge, who came to America from the North of Ireland in 1728, and removed from Pennsylvania to a farm near the present site of Staunton, in Augusta County, Virginia. Robert McClanahan died in 1791, at his home, one mile south of Staunton, on what is known now as the Greenville road. He was, therefore, "the emigrant and founder." His children were Alexander, John, Robert and William (sons) ; with Mrs. St. Clair, Mrs. Dean, Mrs. Poage and Mrs. Keiser (daughters). It is a little doubtful whether Mrs. Poage was daughter or granddaughter of Robert, the first; but the evidence for the former is very strong.

    2. [S65] Military Record, http://lib.jrshelby.com/mcallister-harris.pdf.
      1781. Capt. Wm. McCIenahan's Company at the Battles of Alamance, Reedy Fork and Guilford, 156.
      Neely, James, Jr., Cap Rec April 12, 1781? vice W. McClenahan
      McClenahan, William, Lt Col App July 12, 1781? vice T. Rowland.
      McClenahan, William, Ens Rec Dec 16, 1777? under A. Robertson.
      Section No. 156 [W3431]LEWIS, ANDREW.? Montgomery, Nov. 7, 1832. Born Oct. ?, 1758. Volunteered from Botetourtin February-, 1779, under Capt. Joseph Crockett and Lt, Robert Savers. Was stationed withother forces at Williamsburg till discharged in Maj. Gen. Andrew Lewis, his father, wascommandant. No enemy appeared on land. Later in same year volunteered under Capt. William
      McClenahan and went into Montgomery against some tories who had organized for activeservice. The forces were under Col. William Preston and were engaged a month. Went again insame year against them as volunteer under Capt. James Barnett and Col. Hugh Crockett.Marched with other forces from Ft. Chiswell to Ramseur's Mill, N. C, where the British andtories had just been defeated, this fact determining the officers to return, the war lasting twomonths. Went out in February, 1781, under Capt. William McClenahan and Col. Hugh Crockett,and joined Greene's army in North Carolina. Declarant was in the engagement at Alamance andReedy Fork. At Guilford was on outpost duty, under Colonels Williams and Howard. Totalservice one year. Was mounted on his own horse except in first tour. Never received a cent forhis services, being then in affluence and only interested in sustaining his country.


    3. [S107] Family Histories, http://www.archive.org/stream/mcclanahans00whitgoog/mcclanahans00whitgoog_djvu.txt.
      William McClanahan.
      William was the fourth son of Robert, the Founder. He was born December 25, 1740, and died in 1819. He moved from Augusta Couuty to Botetourt before the battle of Point Pleasant, and settled on or near what is now the McAdam road, three or four miles east of the present site of Salem, in Roanoke County. The farm was afterwards owned by one Cavell. All the land around there, called afterwards "The Barrens," was covered with scrub oak and scrub pine, over which a deer could leap, as Colonel James McClanahan, son of William, said in 1865, to a social company, of whom I was one.
      The Indians were sometimes seen lurking about. This fact greatly alarmed the family on one occasion when the lad, Elijah McClanahan, was belated after nightfall while returning, with a bag of corn meal, from the mill. Their joy was equally great when a diligent search in the night, in which all the neighbors joined, was rewarded by his being found.
      William McClanahan was married to Sarah Neely, March 7, 1769, at the home of her parents, on the creek east of Salem, between that town and the present city of Roanoke. This place was owned, until within a few years past, by Mr. Jerry Fitzer. Her family afterwards moved to Tennessee.
      Mr. McClanahan removed to the south bank of Roanoke River about 1780, beside "the Big Spring", as it was called for nearly a century and a half. It is now known as the Crystal Spring, at the foot of Mill Mountain, on its southwestern side, 'and supplies the city of Roanoke with water. Here he built a house of hewn logs, with two large rooms on the ground floor, and a passage between, one and one-half stories high. After a while two rooms were added. The two chimnies, built of stone, at the ends of the house, were large and contained large fire-places. The house stood northwest and southeast; in front of the right or chamber window of the present house (1894), and distant from it about sixty feet. The northwest end was a few feet to the right of the present walk, which extends from the front door of the house now occupied by Wm. S. McClanahan to the yard gate. It had a porch in front, facing Tinker Mountain. Port-holes were cut in the log walls, through which to fire upon attacking savages. The stairway was within the house. In later years the log walls were weather-boarded. So it stood until 1855, when it was removed by E. G. McClanahan.
      Offspring of William McClanahan, Sr.,
      and Sarah, his Wife.
      1. ELIJAH McClanahan-b. April 20, 1770; married September 3, 1795, Agatha Strother Lewis, daughter of Colonel Andrew Lewis, who then lived on Bent Mountain; offspring, twelve children. Colonel Andrew Lewis was fourth son of General Andrew Lewis.
      2. Nancy McClanahan ; born August 15, 1772; married Colonel William Lewis, son of General Andrew Lewis; owned and lived on what is now called the Burwell estate, near Salem; afterwards moved to Alabama; offspring, a large family; Dr. Andrew Lewis was one of them; Lewis was her second husband; the first was Thomas Madison; Dr. William Lewis, who married Miss Mary McFarland, daughter of Rev. Francis McFarland, D. D., a Presbyterian minister of Augusta County, Virginia, was her son; the Rev. Frank W. Lewis, of Clinton, Louisiana, was their child.
      3. Jane McClanahan ; born November 27, 1774; married Andrew Lewis, grandson of General Andrew Lewis ; offspring, a family of six children; owned and lived on the farm now (1894) owned by Captain R. B. Moorman, on the northwest of Roanoke.
      4. James McClanahan ; born September 10, 1777; married Elizabeth Walton, of Georgia, in April, 1808; offspring. nine children? six sons and three daughters; owned and lived on a farm southwest of Roanoke city, and distant about one mile, on the Norfolk and Western Railroad.
      Colonels Elijah and James McClanahan.
      [Colonel Elijah McClanahan was a man of noble build in body, mind and spirit. In person, he was tall and large, without being portly; his countenance was impressive, blending kindness and candor with gravity; his disposition was cheerful and sociable his probity beyond all reproach; and the love and fear of God governed his life. He was a tower of strength in the Presbyterian Church at Salem as a ruling elder, and was the chief builder of the church at Big Lick. His name in the church extended beyond his own Presbytery. It was considered a privilege by strangers from a distance to know him. His brother, Colonel James McClanahan, was very much like him. It would be difficult to compare and impossible to contrast them. When I went to Roanoke to live in June, i860, their names were on the lips, of everybody. They were better and more favorably known, it seemed to me, than any two men in the county. A noble pair of brothers. Long should their memory be cherished and honored by their descendants.]
      5. John McClanahan; born April 30, 1780; married Lucy Walton, February, 1806, sister of William Walton, who lived one mile west of Salem and was an elder in the Salem church, noted for his piety; offspring, five children, two sons and three daughters; Charles, Sarah Griffin and Lucy Tosh brought up families; lived on a farm adjoining the old homestead on the Franklin turnpike; died in 1814.
      6. Washington McClanahan; born October 3, 1782; unmarried; died in 18 16, from lung trouble, caught, it was said, by sleeping between damp sheets, at a hotel, while stopping on a journey.
      7. Green McClanahan; born October 3, 1782; twin brother of Washington; married Elizabeth Griffin, of Staunton, Virginia, June, 1808; lived on a farm on Glade Creek, one mile or more east of Vinton; died in 1820; offspring, three sons and two daughters.
      8. Mary McClanahan; born March 19, 1785; married Dr. Marcle, of Liberty, (now Bedford City), Bedford County, Virginia; offspring, four children; Dr. Marcle, after her death in 1819, went West.
      9. Sarah McClanahan; born October 13, 1788; married Moses Cook ; lived on Tinker Creek in homestead called "Rocky Dale;" offspring, five children; the widow, with two daughters, Sarah and Julia, moved to Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia, where she died ; (only Sarah and Nancy, of the nine children, died outside of Roanoke County). Mr. Cook was a talented lawyer, of much personal popularity, as was his son William after him; Mrs. Cook was a woman of extraordinary beauty and received much attention in society. Not one of the nine children had a double name.

    4. [S130] Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elijah_McClanahan.
      Elijah McClanahan (April 20, 1770 died 1857) (aka Elijah McClanachan; McClanechan, etc.) was a noted planter and soldier in western Virginia and the Roanoke Valley. He was a Lieutenant Colonel in the 5th/121st Virginia Militia in the War of 1812, and was one of the largest landholders in what later became Roanoke County, Virginia.
      Elijah McClanahan was the son of William and Sarah Neely McClanahan, along with three brothers: John, James and Green.[1] He was also very generous, and probably already had the Smallpox, because at the age of 13, on October 10, 1783, he was "...allowed five pounds for attending a Continental soldier with the small pox."[2] By the age of 22, he was granted a license to keep an ordinary or Tavern in their house.[3]

      Elijah McClanahan married on September 3, 1795, Agatha Strother Lewis (born March 15, 1779, and died June 14, 1852), granddaughter of Colonel Andrew Lewis (soldier), who then lived on Bent Mountain, Virginia. They had twelve children: 1. Elizabeth; married Dr. Gabriel Nash; second husband was Dr. Cox, of Missouri; offspring, several children. 2. Sallie; married Edward White, brother of Alexander White, of Fort Lewis; offspring, seven children. 3. Mary; married R. D. Montague; offspring, five. She was mother-in-law of Judge George Junkin, whose son, William Junkin, is now (1894) missionary in Corea. 4. Agnes; married Dr. John Ingles; offspring, four, one of whom is Mrs. Colonel Thomas Lewis, of Roanoke. 5. Lucy; married William Johnston; offspring, six. 6. Nancy; married Colin Bass. 7. Catharine; married Thomas Ingles; offspring, five. 8. Fannie; married Thomas Micou, of Essex County, Virginia; second husband, Rev. Charles Miller; grandmother of Rev. W. McC. Miller; offspring, five. 9. Jane; married Rev. J. N. Lewis; offspring, two. 10. Peggy; died young. 11. William; engaged to marry Patsy Lewis; both died from fever without having married. 12. Andrew.[4]
      War of 1812

      On August 11, 1795, he took an oath of Captain of the Virginia militia.[5]

      With the organization of the 5th Virginia Militia, Elijah McClanahan was promoted to Lieutenant colonel (United States). He is also listed as the Lieutenant Colonel of the 121st Regiment, Virginia Militia, during the War of 1812.[6]
      Post war

      He was a substantial landowner in Virginia, and "Colonel Elijah McClanahan was the owner of most of the land that ultimately became the Northwest section of Roanoke City ([Roanoke, Virginia])."[7] As early as 1798, he purchased along with his partner and father-in-law, Colonel Andrew Lewis (soldier), two plots of land of 92 and 84 acres each along the Little River (New River) in Montgomery County, Virginia.[8]

      He is credited with owning over 1,500 acres, and with farm holdings valued at over $75,000.[9]

      When the county was formed in 1830, Elijah McClanahan was appointed the sheriff by the governor. "In those days, the duties of the sheriff were somewhat different than they are today. He was charged with collecting taxes, preparing a list of "insolvents", and keeping the jail. His salary was paid through the collection of fees."[10]

      Colonel McClanahan served as a justice when Roanoke County, Virginia, was formed from part of Botetourt County, Virginia. He later was appointed the first high sheriff. "He was also among the trustees chosen at the founding of the town of Salem, among the founding elders of Salem Presbyterian Church (Salem, Virginia), and one of the largest landholders in the county."[11]

      Elijah McClanahan was one of the justices of the county court in 1838, 1852 and 1856.[12]
      Roads

      "Elijah McClanahan, Elias thomas, Lewis Harvey and William McDermed were appointed commissioners to lay off public roads in the county into properr and suitable districts, along with allocating the tithables."[13] Elijah McClananhan was also prominently involved in the Allegheny Turnpike Company, and early turnpike in western Virginia that became part of the Valley Pike, and eventually U.S. Route 11 in Virginia.[14]
      Villa Heights Home

      Elijah McClanahan built a home in 1820. "Built in 1820, the house was owned by Lt. Col. Elijah McClanahan, a War of 1812 veteran. The original Federal architecture was renovated in the early 20th century with Classical revival features on the interior and exterior and has been known as the Compton-Bateman house."[15] This property was later to be known as part of the Villa Heights, Roanoke, Virginia neighborhood in Roanoke, Virginia. Originally named "Long Meadow" by Col. McClanahan, over the years the name of the house was known as "Villa Heights", from which the neighborhood was named, to the Compton-Bateman house, as it is known today.

      "The original dwelling of Villa Heights, built by Elijah McClanahan in 1820, was a comparatively modest Federal style house, compared to its 20th century evolution. However, it was still quite a substantial house for this area during the second quarter of the nineteenth century and, compared to most of the surrounding farmsteads of the time, would have been an iconic and impressive building. Character-defining features of its original Federal design included unpainted Flemish bond, load-bearing brick construction, a molded brick water table, and a five-bay facade with symmetrical fenestration and stone window sills. Today the fašade also features Classical Revival detailing around the entry, notably a round-arched opening with a fanlight transom and five-light sidelights, but it is undetermined as of yet if these were part of the original design or if they were added in a later alteration."[16]
      Death and burial

      Colonel Elijah McClanahan is buried with his spouse and other members of his family in the McClanahan Family Cemetery in Roanoke, Virginia.[17]
      References
      "William McLenachan's Will, 1820." Kegley, F. B. Kegley's Virginia Frontier: The Beginning of the Southwest, the Roanoke of Colonial Days, 1740-1783, with Maps and Illustrations. Roanoke, Virginia: Southwest Virginia Historical Society, 1938. Pages 532-533.
      Summers, Lewis Preston, George W. L. Bickley, and Charles B. Coale. Annals of Southwest Virginia, 1769-1800. Baltimore, Maryland: Clearfield Company, 1929. Page 383.
      Summers, Lewis Preston, George W. L. Bickley, and Charles B. Coale. Annals of Southwest Virginia, 1769-1800. Baltimore, Maryland: Clearfield Company, 1929. Page 448.
      White, H. M. The McClanahans. 1894. [1] Chapter IV. Also pages 40-42. Roanoke, Virginia. The Stone Printing and Manufacturing Company. 1894.
      Summers, Lewis Preston, George W. L. Bickley, and Charles B. Coale. Annals of Southwest Virginia, 1769-1800. Baltimore, Maryland: Clearfield Company, 1929. Page 462.
      Writers' Program (U.S.). Roanoke, Story of County and City. [Roanoke]: [Stone Print. and manufacturing Co.], 1942. Page 330.
      Findagrave.com
      Summers, Lewis Preston, George W. L. Bickley, and Charles B. Coale. Annals of Southwest Virginia, 1769-1800. Baltimore, Maryland: Clearfield Company, 1929. Page 934.
      Kagey, Deedie Dent. When Past Is Prologue: A History of Roanoke County. Roanoke, Va: Roanoke County Sesquicentennial Committee, 1988. Page 132..
      Kagey, Deedie Dent. When Past Is Prologue: A History of Roanoke County. Roanoke, Va: Roanoke County Sesquicentennial Committee, 1988. Page 106.
      Cox, Ray. 2017. Early Roanoke County founder rests at well-groomed gravesite. Roanoke Times. Apr 10, 2017.
      Kagey, Deedie Dent. When Past Is Prologue: A History of Roanoke County. Roanoke, Va: Roanoke County Sesquicentennial Committee, 1988. Page 705.
      Kagey, Deedie Dent. When Past Is Prologue: A History of Roanoke County. Roanoke, Va: Roanoke County Sesquicentennial Committee, 1988. Page 107.
      Virginia. Alleghany Turnpike Company Records. 1847.
      Roanoke Times. March 20, 2018. "Historic mansion in northwest Roanoke added to state landmarks register."
      National Register of Historic Places Registration Form. "Villa Heights". Section 7, page 5.
      Findagrave.com
      Bibliography

    5. [S130] Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elijah_McClanahan.
      Bibliography

      Breckenbridge, James. 1783-1904. Papers. Abstract: Correspondence (chiefly relating to Breckinridge's legal career and his land speculation in western Virginia and Kentucky), legal papers, deeds, militia orders and returns, receipts, accounts, and other papers. Includes description of iron works in Wythe County, Va., Mutual Assurance Society receipts, and rates charged by ordinary keepers (1770). Topics mentioned in correspondence include Virginia and U.S. politics, local elections, War of 1812, settlement of Kentucky and Tennessee, Indian wars, slavery, and Virginia militia, with specific references to formation of Kentucky government, congressional sessions of 1793-1797 and 1805-1812, the Kentucky Resolutions (1798), troubles with squatters in Indian territory, expeditions against Indians (1791 and 1813), collection of whiskey taxes, excise taxes, the national bank, internal improvements, trial of Aaron Burr, mill owned by Breckinridge, and support of two illegitimate children. Correspondents include John Breckinridge, Robert Breckinridge, William Breckinridge, Henry Clay, Francis Walker Gilmer, Peachy R. Gilmer, George Hancock, Andrew Jackson, James Madison, John Marshall, Elijah McClanahan, James McClung, Francis Preston, John Preston, William Preston, Martha Jefferson Randolph, Archibald Stuart, and Bushrod Washington.
      National Register of Historic Places Registration Form. "Villa Heights".
      Roanoke Times. March 20, 2018. "Historic mansion in northwest Roanoke added to state landmarks register."
      White, H. M. The McClanahans. 1716. Abstract: Family history and genealogy compiled by White of the McClanahans, a Scotch-Irish family that settled in Virginia after 1716. The book describes the family's involvement in the French and Indian War and the Revolutionary War. Included is information on the Poage family.
      References

      "William McLenachan's Will, 1820." Kegley, F. B. Kegley's Virginia Frontier: The Beginning of the Southwest, the Roanoke of Colonial Days, 1740-1783, with Maps and Illustrations. Roanoke, Virginia: Southwest Virginia Historical Society, 1938. Pages 532-533.
      Summers, Lewis Preston, George W. L. Bickley, and Charles B. Coale. Annals of Southwest Virginia, 1769-1800. Baltimore, Maryland: Clearfield Company, 1929. Page 383.
      Summers, Lewis Preston, George W. L. Bickley, and Charles B. Coale. Annals of Southwest Virginia, 1769-1800. Baltimore, Maryland: Clearfield Company, 1929. Page 448.
      White, H. M. The McClanahans. 1894. [1] Chapter IV. Also pages 40-42. Roanoke, Virginia. The Stone Printing and Manufacturing Company. 1894.
      Summers, Lewis Preston, George W. L. Bickley, and Charles B. Coale. Annals of Southwest Virginia, 1769-1800. Baltimore, Maryland: Clearfield Company, 1929. Page 462.
      Writers' Program (U.S.). Roanoke, Story of County and City. [Roanoke]: [Stone Print. and manufacturing Co.], 1942. Page 330.
      Findagrave.com
      Summers, Lewis Preston, George W. L. Bickley, and Charles B. Coale. Annals of Southwest Virginia, 1769-1800. Baltimore, Maryland: Clearfield Company, 1929. Page 934.
      Kagey, Deedie Dent. When Past Is Prologue: A History of Roanoke County. Roanoke, Va: Roanoke County Sesquicentennial Committee, 1988. Page 132..
      Kagey, Deedie Dent. When Past Is Prologue: A History of Roanoke County. Roanoke, Va: Roanoke County Sesquicentennial Committee, 1988. Page 106.
      Cox, Ray. 2017. Early Roanoke County founder rests at well-groomed gravesite. Roanoke Times. Apr 10, 2017.
      Kagey, Deedie Dent. When Past Is Prologue: A History of Roanoke County. Roanoke, Va: Roanoke County Sesquicentennial Committee, 1988. Page 705.
      Kagey, Deedie Dent. When Past Is Prologue: A History of Roanoke County. Roanoke, Va: Roanoke County Sesquicentennial Committee, 1988. Page 107.
      Virginia. Alleghany Turnpike Company Records. 1847.
      Roanoke Times. March 20, 2018. "Historic mansion in northwest Roanoke added to state landmarks register."
      National Register of Historic Places Registration Form. "Villa Heights". Section 7, page 5.
      Findagrave.com
      Bibliography

    6. [S89] Facebook, https://www.facebook.com/groups/74154119701/.
      Al Linton? to Roanoke County Genealogy Virginia
      Looking for a direct descendant of 2nd Lt. William Walton (1749 - 1845) of Green Hill ca 1776 interred at Craig-Walton Burial Ground now located Salem, Roanoke County, Virginia.
      Green Hill House Download

    7. [S32] Find-A-Grave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/147515192/sarah-mcclanahan.
      Sarah Neely McClanahan
      Birth 1748
      Virginia, USA
      Death 1824 (aged 75?76)
      Roanoke, Roanoke City, Virginia
      ************
      William McClanahan
      Birth 25 Dec 1740, Augusta County, Virginia
      Death 19 Nov 1819 (aged 78)
      Roanoke, Roanoke City, Virginia
      Sarah Neely was the daughter of James Neely and Margaret Jane Grymes.

      She married to William McClanahan on 07 Mar 1769 in Botetourt County, Colony of Virginia. They had at least nine children.
      William was the son of Robert McClenachan "McClanahan" Sr. and Sarah Breckenridge.

      He married to Sarah Neely on 07 Mar 1769 in Botetourt County of Virginia. They had at least nine children.

      In 1795, William was a prominent landowner and county Sheriff. He bought Evan's Mill and changed the name to McClanahan's Mill. The name of the nearby mountain, Mill Mountain, came from the presence of this mill. The family owned 1,800 acres in the area and their collective holdings were known as the Crystal Spring Land Company, which became the Roanoke Land Improvement Company, and eventually Roanoke Gas and Water Company.