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PATRIOT Lt. Col. William McClanahan, Reverend[1, 2]

Male 1733 - 1802  (69 years)


Personal Information    |    Media    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name William McClanahan 
    Title PATRIOT 
    Prefix Lt. Col. 
    Suffix Reverend 
    Born 23 Feb 1733  Cople Parish, Westmoreland Co., Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 15 May 1802  Greenville Co., South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Greenville Co., South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I19141  My Reynolds Line
    Last Modified 22 Jul 2019 

    Father William McClanahan,   b. Abt 1691, Northumberland, Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Oct 1771, Cople Parish, Westmoreland Co., Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 80 years) 
    Mother Martha Margaret Smith,   b. Abt 1710, Westmoreland, Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1770, Cople Parish, Westmoreland Co., Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 60 years) 
    Married
    • Children of Wm. McClanahan and Martha Margaret Smith:
      Eleanor Land; Rev. William McClanahan; Capt. Thomas McClannahan; Peter McClannahan; James McClanahan; John McClannahan and Deborah McClannahan
    Family ID F7063  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Mary [Markham] 'Molly' Marshall,   b. 28 Apr 1737, Washington Parish, Westmoreland Co., Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Jan 1809, Greenville Co., South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years) 
    Married
    • Children of Rev. Wm. McClanahan and Mary Marshall:
      Elvira Stallard;
      Thomas Marshall McClanahan;
      William McClannahan;
      Nancy Basye;
      Peter John McClanahan;
      John Marshall McClanahan and
      Mary Triplett
    Notes 
    • 12 Rev. (Capt.) WILLIAM MCCLANAHAN (Wm.2 Thos.1), b. Cople Parish, Westmoreland County, Virginia, 23 Feb. 1733, apparently 3rd child, married, after her father's death in 1752 Mary Marshall, ante.
      Following the Marshall family to Goose Creek, Hamilton (now Leeds) Parish, Fauquier County, Virginia, he made this indenture: CONYERS TO MCCLANAHAME: (spelled this way throughout this document) This indenture made this 25th day of November in the 4th year of the reign of our sovereign Lord George the Third, by the Grace of God of Great Britain, France & Ireland, King Defender of the Faith: between John Conyers of the parish of Hamilton and County of Fauquier of the one part and William McClanahame of the same parish and county of the other part.
      Witnesseth that the said John Conyers for and in consideration of the sum of Fifty Pounds to himself in hand paid (the receipt whereof he doth hereby acknowledge himself to be fully satisfied and paid) hath demised, granted, and assigned 184 acres of land Scituate (??) and lying in the above County and bounded as followeth, viz: beginning at three white oaks on the eastern side of Carter?s Run (ca. 8 miles west of Warrentown, MLM), 40 poles below Pickett?s Mill, thence north 26 East and 11 poles to a pine marked for a corner to the dividing line between John Conyers and Samuel Conyers, thence with the dividing line South 3 degrees S.E. and 320 poles to a marked pine in the old line of the said tract, thence with the said line South 23 degrees, 35 poles to a marked pine, thence South 51 West 110 poles to a white oak, then South 70-1/2 west 110 poles crossing a branch to two pines, thence south 3 chains, west 72 poles to a corner of Carter?s Run, thence up the several meanders of the said Run to the beginning.
      Together with all houses, orchards, woods, waters, and appurtenances whatsoever to the said land belonging or in anywise appertaining. To have and to hold unto the said William McClanahame, his heirs and assigns from the Day of the date hereof until the full and term of one year thence next coming shall be fully completed and ended. Yielding and paying the fee rent of one year Indian corn upon the feast day of the Nativity of our Lord Christ only if the same be demanded to the intent that by virtue of these presents and of the Statute for transferring uses into possession of the said McClanahame may be in actual possession of the said 184 acres of land and premises and be thereby enabled to accept a grant of the revision and inheritance thereof. In witness whereof the parties to these presents Indentures have interchangeably set their hands and seals the day and year above written.
      In Presence of: Thomas McClanahame John Conyers, L.S.
      Samuel Conyers
      William (his ?x? mark) Pritchett

      At a Court continued and held for Fauquier County this 25th day of Nov. 1763, this indenture is as proved sale, act and dues of the said John Conyers by the oaths of Thomas McClanahame, Samuel Conyers, and William Pritchett, witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded.
      Teste: J. Brooke, Clerk
      From Bk. 2 (1763-1767), pg 98/9; Hamilton Parish; from John & Alice Conners
    Children 
    +1. Thomas Marshall [KY] McClanahan,   b. 1753, Cople Parish, Westmoreland Co., Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Oct 1845, Franklin, Simpson Co., KY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 92 years)
     2. Susan [Marshall] McClanahan,   b. 1772, Copal Parish, Westmoreland Co., Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1849, Columbia, Boone, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years)
    Last Modified 5 Sep 2019 
    Family ID F7103  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Documents
    Map of Part of Augusta County, Colony of Virginia 1755-1760; Shows Tinkling Spring Church and Fort Chiswell
    Map of Part of Augusta County, Colony of Virginia 1755-1760; Shows Tinkling Spring Church and Fort Chiswell
    Map_of_Augusta_County_1755-1760.jpg

  • Notes 
    • McClanahan Notes from FTDNA:
      NOTES ON VIRGINIA BAPTISTS, 1772, by Morgan Edwards.
      Mr. William McClanahan, born February 23, 1733 in Westmoreland County, Virginia. Bred a churchman. Embraced the sentiments of Baptists. Baptized in 1768 by Samuel Harris. His convictions were without means (?? MLM), and very strong. Moved to pray when he heard singing. Ordained. Married Mary Marshall. Children: Thos., William (see ante Rev. William?s will), Peter, Elvira, Ann, Mary, Alice.
      He was in gaol in Orange County: Warrant for his arrest ?
      Whereas we have received information that Nathaniel Saunders and William McClanahan, stiling (sic) themselves Protestant Divinities, does teach and Preach contrary to the laws and usages of the Kingdom of Great Britain, raising sedition and stirring up strife among his Majesties? Liege people.
      Therefore in his Majesties name we require your Samuel Ferguson and John Lillard to take Nathaniel Saunders and William McClanahan and bring before some Justice of the Peace and there allowed to be examined touching the charges, and we condemn all his majesties subject to be aiding and abetting in the said execution thereof.
      Given under our hands and seals this 21st day of August 1773 to the Sheriff of Orange, Constable??..) Signed: John Slaughter
      And to Samuel Ferguson) George M. Weatherall
      NO LICENSE (Document is quite faded, MLM)
      NORTHERN NECK HISTORICAL MAGAZINE, Dec. 1951, pub. At Montrose, Westmoreland County, Virginia, pg. 16:??Previous to this, and indeed as early as 1771, William McClanahan was going about through the wilderness very much in the manner of John the Baptist and preaching the Gospel of Salvation by baptism. Northumberland can justly claim William McClanahan as her own, for the family is registered and referred to in the St. Stephens Parish Records?? (see ante, pg. 134).
      Mr. Woodford B. Hackley, Va. Baptish Church historian: ?He was pastor of the original Upper Carter?s Run Church, Fauquier County. The earliest remaining records were kept by storekeeper Peter Hitt, treasurer of the church. At one time he paid William McClanahan money for expenses to go to the Association. He (William) was a magistrate, probably a J.P. in Culpepper (now Rappahannock) County, and the church was called Upper Carter?s Run Church. He acknowledged many deeds in that section of the county.
      The Baptist Church at Jeffersonton, Culpepper County, was founded in Fauquier County ca. 1773. That structure lasted until 1819, and was just over the Rappahannock River, the part then called Hedgeman?s River, so it was called Hedgemen?s River Church.
      The Baptist church called Mt. Poney (now Culpepper Church) was founded in 1774 from Mountain Run Church in Orange County, and was at least sixteen or seventeen miles from Jeffersonton, at least two miles beyond the town of Culpepper on the road to Stevensburg.? (Nathaniel Saunders was its first pastor ? for many years). ?I joined it in 1905, the Hedgeman?s River Church ca. six miles from Jeffersonton in Fauquier.?
      From the Religious Herald: The first Baptist Church in Culpepper was in (now) Rappahannock County near Mulkey or Mulky Mountain ca. one mile from present Washington ? ?the first Washington? the natives call it, on land given by Thomas McClanahan. The church lasted but two years.
      Part of the members of the original Carter?s Run Church seem to have gone to Battle Run Church; the others into Fauquier County to found Fiery Run Baptist Church.
      With the rapidly growing indignation of the colonists toward their second class citizenship ? with Parliament at the behest of the English merchants passing laws severely restricting their trades and manufactures and ?hard money,? Rev. William McClanahan, as Captain of his fellow Baptists in a company of Minute Men, regularly preached to them (Notes of Culpepper, ante), the Major was Thomas Marshall, son John a Lieutenant, later becoming Chief Justice of the U.S.A. Only John Peter Muhlenburg, a neighbor, joined Rev. McClanahan as a religious leader in the field at the request of Congress ? Reverend Muhlenburg becoming a general in the Continental Army.
      Mr. Raleigh Travers Green in his Notes on Culpepper County, adding to Dr. Slaughter?s St. mark?s Parish data, stated that the Baptists were among the most strenuous supporters of liberty, and that the Culpepper-Fauquier Battalion wore green hunting shirts with ?Liberty or Death? inscribed on their shirt fronts. He added that John Pickett was Pastor of Mt. Poney Church until 1790 ? its constituents were from Carter?s Run, Fauquier County. The name was changed to Culpepper 29 April 1873.
      Confined to jail in Culpepper County for their faith: Rev?s. John Pickett; Elijah Craig, taken while at his plow; the worst punishment was received by James Ireland of Edensburg, baptized by Samuel Harris in 1769-?70. He suffered from abuses, the weather, poisoning, gunpowder, suffocation, etc. ? about a hundred instances. Several other preachers were mentioned by Green, in punishments.
      ?Tho records are lost, Captain McClanahan must have kept up his membership at Carter?s Run. It was closer ? he was an original member. After the Revolution he lived on the upper part of Indian Run. I grew up on the lower part of the stream, but I know that part of the country pretty well. The last land he sold was not far from Battle Mountain, sort of betwixt and between Viewtown and Amissville. Thomas Corbin patented the land on which he lived.?

      Fauquier Co. Mg. Bk. #1, pg. 411, July 15, 1793: William McClanahan, Culpepper: ?I do hereby certify I am willing that Peggy Berden (Bender?) alias Timber, a free colored mulatto who was bound to me, should intermarry with James Nickins, both of whom are people of color.?
      Excerpt, Pension application of Samuel Burke, wife Mary, of Jessamine County, KY, aged 73 years: ??I entered the service of Captain William McClanahan of Culpepper County, VA?.marched to Williamsburg, then returned home. I volunteered to stay, so I enlisted in the company of Capt. Abraham Buford, unit #7. In the company of McClanahan and Buford we marched from Williamsburg to the Long Bridge and fought the enemy?marched to Norfolk. The Col. Was Stephen. The Major was Thos. Martin?marched from Norfolk to Suffolk?thence to Portsmouth under Major Scott. From Portsmouth to Culpepper and was discharged in 1777, etc., etc.
      Ky. Rev. Pens. Appli., bourbon Co., KY, by Mrs. A. W. Burns, pg. 11: of Lewis Corbin, Culpepper Co., VA, a. 78 years. April 1, 1832: was Sgt. In Capt. McClanahan?s militia company in 1780.
      Account Bk., 1775/6: service 30 Sept 1776; his Co. issued pay 4 Nov 1775.
      Part of the members of the original Carter?s Run Church seem to have gone to Battle Run Church; the others into Fauquier County to found Fiery Run Baptist Church.
      With the rapidly growing indignation of the colonists toward their second class citizenship ? with Parliament at the behest of the English merchants passing laws severely restricting their trades and manufactures and ?hard money,? Rev. William McClanahan, as Captain of his fellow Baptists in a company of Minute Men, regularly preached to them (Notes of Culpepper, ante), the Major was Thomas Marshall, son John a Lieutenant, later becoming Chief Justice of the U.S.A. Only John Peter Muhlenburg, a neighbor, joined Rev. McClanahan as a religious leader in the field at the request of Congress ? Reverend Muhlenburg becoming a general in the Continental Army.
      Mr. Raleigh Travers Green in his Notes on Culpepper County, adding to Dr. Slaughter?s St. mark?s Parish data, stated that the Baptists were among the most strenuous supporters of liberty, and that the Culpepper-Fauquier Battalion wore green hunting shirts with ?Liberty or Death? inscribed on their shirt fronts. He added that John Pickett was Pastor of Mt. Poney Church until 1790 ? its constituents were from Carter?s Run, Fauquier County. The name was changed to Culpepper 29 April 1873.
      Confined to jail in Culpepper County for their faith: Rev?s. John Pickett; Elijah Craig, taken while at his plow; the worst punishment was received by James Ireland of Edensburg, baptized by Samuel Harris in 1769-?70. He suffered from abuses, the weather, poisoning, gunpowder, suffocation, etc. ? about a hundred instances. Several other preachers were mentioned by Green, in punishments.


  • Sources 
    1. [S244] Colonial Families, https://worldfamilies.net/blog/31558.
      On 21:04pm, November 26th, 2013 David McClanahan said:
      Re: McClanahan Family Pedigrees

      Thomas McClanahan, d c1683 Northumberland Co VA, m Dorthy Mooney, d, c 1717
      +William McClanahan, d c1771 Westmoreland Co VA, m Martha Smith
      ++Rev. William McClanahan, b 1732, d 1802 Greenville Co SC, m Mary Marshall, b 1738, d 1809
      +++Thomas Marshall McClanahan b 1753 Westmoreland Co VA, d 15 Oct 1845 Bourbon Co KY, m 12 Mar 1778 Anne Green d 1816
      ++++Alexander McClanahan b 1785 VA, d 1855 Smith Co TN, m 1813 Sarah Clymer b 1795 d 1865
      +++++James H McClanahan b 1826 KY, m 2 Jan 1851 Mary Elizabeth Woodmore b 1820 VA d 25 Jan 1882 Trousdale Co, TN
      ++++++Bailey Peyton McClanahan b 6 jan 1854, Trousdale Co TN, d 25 Mar 1926, m 1874 Lillian Eller b 15 Oct 1859 TN d 5 Mar 1882 TN
      +++++++James Bailey McClanahan b 24 Dec 1878 Trousdale Co TN, d 7 Dec 1953 Trousdale Co TN, m 1900 Mary Wright b 30 Mar 1880 TN, d 10 May 1939 Trousdale Co TN.

      My kit number is B6951 and I am currently awaiting my yDNA upgrade results.


    2. [S40] Will, Reverend and Lt. Col. William McClanahan.
      THE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF WILLIAM Mc CLANAHAN:
      "The last will & testament of Wm Mc Clanahan I William Mc Clanahan of the State of South Carolina and district of Greenville, do constitute & establish this my last will & testament. Item it is my will and desire that my beloved wife Mary Mc Clanahan shall occupy possess and enjoy the whole of the estate with which I am possessed during her life consisting of all the lands I own in the aforesaid district with all my negroes except, one fellow named Joseph, with all my stock of every kind plantation utensils household and kitchen furniture, with all the money I have in hand and all that is due to me except one hundred dollars Item I give and bequeth the afresaid one hundred dollars to my son Thomas Mc Clanahan with the above excepted negro Joseph as also all lands I have any right to or claim in the western country or the State of Kentucky to him and his heirs forever which said negro and one hundred dollars or the only parts of my estate which shall be subjected to a division before the death of my wife, it is my wish and desire that she shall have full power and her option and discretion to make such distributions of the money which may arise from the collection of my debts and the profits of my estate as she may deem advisable and expedient for the relief and convenience of my daughters, provided nevertheless that the donations she may make them respectively shall not exceed the dividend or rateable part to which they may be entitled on an equal division of the same Item it is also my wish and desire that my well beloved wife shall be at full liberty agreeable to her judgment to sell and dispose of any part of my stock whatsoever and to appropriate the money arising from the sale thereof in the manner before specified. Item it is my will and desire that immediately after the death of my wife the remaining part of my estate shall be divided in the following manner, viz, Item I give and bequeath to my son Thomas Mc Clanahan one negro boy named Bartlet but in case my said son should die before the execution of this will my will is that his son Green Mc Clanahan shall enjoy and possess the said Negro Bartlett for ever. Item I give and bequeath to my son John Mc Clanahan that tract of land on which I now live also the tract which I purchased of John Robinson also four negroes namely Augustino, Patty, Rachel and George but should my said son John die before his mother my will and desire is that the said land and negroes shall descend to his child or children to be equally divided amongst them which they and their heirs shall inherit forever.

      Item I give and bequeath to my grandson Marshall Mc Clanahan on negro girl named Betty with her increase to him and his heirs forever. Item it is my will and desire that all the rest of my estate or the remaining part thereof shall be divided in the following manner viz, that my executors shall expose the same to public auction allowing twelve months credit and on a collection of the money arising from the sale thereof together with such sum as may be left remaining in her hands with what may be due my estate I request my executors to divide among my daughters, that is to say Nancy, Basey, Molley Triplett, Alsey Abbot and Suckey Robinson including two of my grandchildren, viz, Mc Clanahan Statlard and Hannah Carter who are to receive one equal share with my said daughters and that share to be equally divided between the said two grandchildren but in case either of them should die before the execution of this will the surviving one to enjoy and posses the whole forever.

      Item it is my desire that this my last will & testament be recorded, but it is not my wish that any inventory of my estate be taken, the request that my before mentioned son John Mc Clanahan and my fried Lemuel James Alston and John Robinson will tend to, and see that is faithfully executed according to the tenor thereof and lastly I do disavow and revoke all wills heretofore made by me. In witness of which I do hereunto set my hand and affix my seal this fifteenth day of May 1802.

      Wm Mc Clanahan (Seal)

      Test

      John Young, Junr

      John W Hansell

      William Hansell" (Recorded in Greenville Co., S.C. Will Book A . p. 176, Apt 9, file 634; see

      also Virginia Historical Magazine, Vol. 41 , pp. 353-355).

      Although there is some confusion about the McClanahans, we know that our Thomas, who served in the Revolutionary War and later as an Indian fighter under General "Mad" Anthony Wayne, is the son of this William ( Historical Atlas of Westmoreland Co., VA, id at p. 38).

      The Daughters of the American Revolution has accepted This William McClanahan as a patriot ancestor ( DAR #15338, DAR Patriot Index, Vol. 55 , p. 112). The SAR has accepted him as a Patriot for both President General Larry D. McClanahan and the author.

      He was apparently promoted to LT. Col. during the Revolutionary War, as he was buried with military honors as a Lt. Colonel ( Kentucky Memories of Uncle Sam Williams (1938), p. 17, cited in M.L. Mc Clanahan, id at p. 112).

    3. [S127] Geni, https://www.geni.com/people/Mary-McClanahan/3162137.
      Mary McClanahan (Marshall)
      Also Known As: "Molly", "Sophronia"
      Birthdate: April 28, 1737
      Birthplace: Washington Parish, Westmoreland County, Province of Virginia
      Death: January 22, 1809
      Greenville District, South Carolina (Natural Causes)
      Place of Burial: Greenville, Greenville County, SC
      Daughter of Capt. John Marshall "of the Forest" and Elizabeth Martha Markham
      Wife of Rev. William McClanahan
      Mother of Elvira Stallard; Thomas Marshall McClanahan; William McClannahan; Nancy Basye; Peter John McClanahan; John Marshall McClanahan and Mary Triplett
      Sister of Mary Neal (Marsy) Wiseman; Ann Smith; Elizabeth Martin; Col. Thomas Marshall; John Marshall; Rev. William Marshall; Abraham Markham Marshall; Sarah Marshall Lovell and Margaret Snelling

    4. [S244] Colonial Families, https://worldfamilies.net/blog/31558.
      On 21:04pm, November 26th, 2013 David McClanahan said:
      Re: McClanahan Family Pedigrees

      Thomas McClanahan, d c1683 Northumberland Co VA, m Dorthy Mooney, d, c 1717
      +William McClanahan, d c1771 Westmoreland Co VA, m Martha Smith
      ++Rev. William McClanahan, b 1732, d 1802 Greenville Co SC, m Mary Marshall, b 1738, d 1809
      +++Thomas Marshall McClanahan b 1753 Westmoreland Co VA, d 15 Oct 1845 Bourbon Co KY, m 12 Mar 1778 Anne Green d 1816
      ++++Alexander McClanahan b 1785 VA, d 1855 Smith Co TN, m 1813 Sarah Clymer b 1795 d 1865
      +++++James H McClanahan b 1826 KY, m 2 Jan 1851 Mary Elizabeth Woodmore b 1820 VA d 25 Jan 1882 Trousdale Co, TN
      ++++++Bailey Peyton McClanahan b 6 jan 1854, Trousdale Co TN, d 25 Mar 1926, m 1874 Lillian Eller b 15 Oct 1859 TN d 5 Mar 1882 TN
      +++++++James Bailey McClanahan b 24 Dec 1878 Trousdale Co TN, d 7 Dec 1953 Trousdale Co TN, m 1900 Mary Wright b 30 Mar 1880 TN, d 10 May 1939 Trousdale Co TN.
      My kit number is B6951 and I am currently awaiting my yDNA upgrade results.

    5. [S100] Internet Source, http://judge-ed-butler.sarsat.org/Genealogy/REVLTCOLWILLIAMMCCLANAHAN.htm.
      A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF REV./LT. COL. WILLIAM McCLANAHAN And the Culpeper Minutemen by JUDGE EDWARD F. BUTLER, SR.
      Rev. / Lt. Colonel William McClanahan and his son Thomas, are both Patriot Ancestors of Judge Ed Butler.
      "Reverend William McClanahan born in Westmoreland County Virginia Colony, about 1738, married in 1758, Mary Marshall. He raised a company of Baptist Volunteers in Culpeper County during the Revolution and they were called 'the fighting Baptists'. Their family removed to Greenville District, South Carolina. He had a son Thomas McClanahan, who was a noted Indian fighter. His will was made May 15, 1802 and date of proof not given, but he died 1802". ( Historical Atlas of Westmoreland County, Virginia , David W. Eaton, The Dietz Press, Richmond, 1942, p. 38, FHL, Salt Lake City, microfilm #323777).

      There are many deeds on record in Culpeper Co., VA; Bouborn Co., KY and Greenville Co., SC to and from William McClanahan.
      RELIGIOUS INTOLERENCE IN VIRGINIA
      During the 1760's most of the colonists in Virginia were of the Anglican faith, as they had been in England. Only the Anglican Church was legal in Virginia at that time. There was a rise of the Baptist Church in Fauquier Co., VA. Among the Baptist ministers was Rev. William McClanahan. He served as assistant to John Pickett at Carter's Run Baptist Church in Fauquier County. Episcopal ministers would go to Baptist services and take notes of the comments from the pulpit. These notes were used to obtain arrest warrants against the Baptist ministers. William Mc Clanahan was arrested on 21 August 1773 along with Nathaniel Saunders, pastor of Mountain Run in Orange Co. The charges were that they did "Teach & Preach Contrary to the Laws & usages of the Kingdom of Great Britain, raising Sedition & Stirring up Strife amongst his Majestie's Liege People" (The original warrant is located at the Baptist Historical Society). The author has a reproduction of that warrant framed in his study.
      "This stalwart preacher, Rev. William McClanahan, had led a somewhat tumultuous career in his youth, becoming locally famous for his physical power and his fondness for the displaying of it: a sort of 'holy terror'; a sort of Daniel Morgan type to the youths who were 'seeking trouble' or spoiling for a fight. But he 'got religion', and soon it was being said that he had become a Baptist preacher for the fun he would have in quelling the disturbance at Baptist meetings.
      "The fervent young sons of the Established Church often when 'out on a spree', indulging in the sport of breaking up such meetings and hazing the meek young preacher of that creed.
      "Howbeit his first appearance in the sacred desk is said to have been peculiar. Three older preachers held a protracted meeting and touched up the Episcopalians until mischief became rife. Preacher number one had not proceeded far one day when he was preemptively commanded by a voice in the audience to 'drop that subject and take up something else'. Number two and number three successively defied the oppressors and shared the same fate. Then the athletic William McClanahan towered above the pulpit, divested of all cumbersome apparel, in fighting trim, and said, "Now suppose you try that on me'. Whereupon it was said silence and attention pervaded the audience while he pitched into the Established Church and severely scored the rowdies and "Imps of Satan", whom it permitted to represent its fairness and decency on such occasions". (Kentucky Memories of Uncle Sam Williams, edited and commentary by Nathaniel Cheairs Hughes, Jr., privately published in Chattanooga, TN, 1978, p.17)
      The outcome of the arrest is unclear. From 1770 to 1775 the Virginia House of Burgesses put aside petitions filed by Baptists and other "Protestant dissenters". The issue was minimized somewhat by the winds of war blowing throughout the Colonies. When the Third Virginia Convention met in Richmond in 1775 to recruit soldiers, they decided to seize upon the religious fervor. The Baptists requested that they be allowed "free Liberty to preach to the troops at convenient Times without molestation or abuse". The Convention resolved that military officers "permit dissenting clergymen to celebrate divine worship, and to preach to the soldiers, or exhort from time to time". This newfound tolerance led to the formation of Revolutionary companies of soldiers based upon their faith. In Culpeper County, Capt. William McClanahan, raised one of the eight companies of Culpeper Minutemen. In 1844 Capt. Philip Slaughter recalled that "at first he (McClanahan) regularly preached to his men (Culpeper, A Virginia County's History through 1920 , E.M. Scheel, Culpeper Hist. Soc., 1982, p.51).
      Another writer claimed that the presence of William Mc Clanahan stopped the violence: "At their meetings the mob was pretty quiet, chiefly owing to the presence of Mr. Mc ______, who is a robust man and has been a mighty buffer." (Kentucky Memoirs, Id at p. 18, citing Materials Towards a History of the Baptists in the Province of Virginia , by Morgan Edwards, from the Furman Manuscript).
      In 1780, William Mc Clanahan supplied 5 bushels of wheat to the Continental Army, during the Revolutionary War (Virginia Publick Claims, Culpeper County , compiled by Janice L. Abercrombie and Richard Slatten, Iberian Press, Athens, Ga., p. 29). When the Culpeper Co., VA Court met on 7 Nov 1780 to consider the claims of citizens who had provided supplies to the army, William McClanahan was paid 72 Pounds for rye supplied to the army and 234 Pounds and 12 Shillings for wheat (id at p. 62). Another certificate for payment in the amount of 122 Pounds was given for rye provided after 23 Nov 1780 (id at p. 63). In 1781 he supplied the army with 250 pounds of beef (id at p.2). In July 1781 he turned over 300 additional pounds of beef for the troops (id at p. 60).

      THE CULPEPER MINUTE MEN
      The largest battalion of Minute Men was composed of men from the Culpeper District, which included the Counties of Culpeper, Orange and Fauquier. Culpeper raised five companies, including that of William "Mc Clenachan" (An 18th Century Perspective: Culpeper County, compiled by M.S. Jones, Culpeper Hist. Soc[1976], p.15).
      By Sept 1775 some 300 Minute Men had already been raised, including William Mc Clanahan's Company. Maj. Thomas Marshall (who later was promoted to Colonel), William's brother in law was third in command of the Battalion. "The whole regiment appeared according to orders in hunting shirts made of strong, brown, linen, dyed the color of the leaves of the trees, and on the breast of each hunting shirt was worked in large white letters the words 'Liberty or Death!' and all that could procure for love or money bucks' tails in the hats. Each man had a leather belt around his shoulders, with a tomahawk and scalping knife" (Id a p. 55).
      In September, 1775, Col. Patrick Henry ordered the Minute Men to Williamsburg, a march of about 150 miles. One Minute Man observed the reaction of the people of Williamsburg to these new guardians:
      Many people hearing we were from the backwoods . . . and seeing our dress, were as much afraid of us for a few days as if we had been indians (sic); but finding that we were orderly and attentive in guarding the city, they treated us with great respect. We took great pride in demeaning ourselves as patriots and gentlemen (An 18th Century Perspective, Id at p. 16).
      The flag they used is well known. In the center is a coiled snake ready to strike. Beneath the snake are the words: "Don't tread on me!" Along each side were the immortal words of Colonel Patrick Henry, the Commander in Chief of Virginia's provisional army: "Liberty or Death". The top of the flag contained the words: "The Culpeper Minute Men" (Ibid ). The author has a reproduction of that flag in his study.
      The Minute Men were ill equipped. Fewer than half had rifles. Those who were armed carried "fowling-pieces and squirrel-guns". Nevertheless, they succeeded in repulsing the British invasion of Norfolk on New Year's Day 1776. Because of a shortage of arms the Minute Men were required to give up their weapons to the Continental Army. They were all discharged by Spring (Id at p. 57).
      Immediately after the peace treaty was signed in Paris in 1783, William McClanahan was one of the first thirty justices to swear allegiance to the United States (Id at pp. 62-63).
      The Commonwealth of Virginia awarded a Treasury Warrant for 500 acres of land in the Kentucky Territory to William McClanahan. The patent was dated 17 May 1795. This transaction is memorialized in two additional deeds among family members. William conveyed 200 acres of that land on the East side of Cedar Creek in County of Nelson to Thomas McClanahan on 9 Sept. 1799. Thomas and his wife Nancy (nee Green) sold this 200 acres to Matthew Rogers of Nelson Co., KY for 58 Pounds on 11 Nov 1800 (Tyler's Quarterly Magazine, Vol, XIII , p 278).
      A THUMBNAIL SKETCH OF LT. COL. WILLIAM MC CLANAHAN
      "William Mc Clanahan was one of the more colorful men in the eight companies of eighty-four men each, formed in Culpeper for the Continental service. A Baptist minister as well as soldier, Capt. McClanahan raised one of these companies and served as Captain. His recruits were principally from his own denomination, and he preached to his men between other duties.
      "Woodford B. Hackley, a native of Jeffersonton, Culpeper County, and a distinguished historian, states that Capt. McClanahan was the 'only captain, to my certain knowledge, definitely documented' who participated in the Williamsburg - Great Bridge campaign of 1775. He describes him as a 'powerful man physically, a giant of a fellow. "According to Dr. Hackley, much of the time during the Revolution a William Mc Clanahan served as a local justice (or magistrate) in the Little Fork area. He presumes this was the William McClanahan who was a Culpeper Minute Men Captain. Capt. McClanahan lived on Big Indian Run in the Little Fork. "McClanahan, the first Baptist preacher in the lower counties of the Northern Neck (Virginia) prior to 1770, was one of the boldest and most enterprising of the early Protestant dissenters of Virginia. One of the 37 constituent members of Carter's Run Baptist Church, Fauquier County, he halted a mob that was engaged in the destruction of that church in 1770 while the church was unoccupied. In 1773, a warrant was issued for the arrest of McClanahan and Nathaniel Saunders, who, as Protestant dissenters, were charged with teaching and preaching 'contrary to the laws and usages of the King of Great Britain, raising sedition and stirring up strife among His Majestie's liege people" (An 18th Century Perspective, Id at p. 63; an editorial note signed by Mary Stevens Jones, citing the following sources: Green's Notes on Culpeper and St. Mark's Parish ; Dr. Hackley's letter; Semple's History of the Rise and Progress of Baptists in Virginia; Ryland's The Baptists of Virginia; Moore & Lumpkin's Meaningful Moments in Virginia Baptist Life ).
      On 21 Jan 1784 William McClanahan of Greenville Co., SC had surveyed 200 acres of land in Kentucky on the Cedar Creek watercourse (The Genealogy and History of Thomas and Dorthy Mooney McClanahan, Early Virginia Immigrants From Ireland, compiled by M.L. McClanahan, p. 58).
      On 3 Sep 1794 William McClanahan of Greenville Co., SC deeded land to Thomas McClanahan, his son, of Bourbon Co., KY for 26 Pounds. The land was bounded by land owned by Thomas McClanahan on the north, Peter Moore on the west, and John Green on the right (Bourbon Co., KY Deed Book C , p. 108; reproduced in Tyler's Quarterly Mag., Vol. XIII , pp. 283-284).
      The following petition of October 27, 1790, is of interest since it lists the citizenry of Bourbon County, Kentucky soon after the founding of the new county seat:
      To the Honourable and general Assembly at the Town of Richmond in the State of Virginia;
      The petition of Sundry of the Inhabitants of the County of Bourbon Humbly prays your Honours to Grant your Petitioners and Inspection for Tobacco on Stoner at the Town of Hopewell and your Petitioners in are in Duty your Humble Servts."
      signed Thos. McClanahan and others.
      The earliest record of the land on which Paris, Kentucky, stands was uncovered in an old suit over a military grant to one Walter Stewart for service as a sergeant in his Majesty's 44th Regiment of foot and agreeable to the Royal Proclamation of 1763, for 200 acres in Fincastle (later Bourbon) County. Col. John Floyd, who was the principal surveyor of the Transylvania Company and delegate to the Assembly that met at Boonsborough May 24, 1775, to make laws for the infant colony, acting as deputy surveyor to William Preston of Fincastle, surveyed this grant for Stewart in 1776. He made his first location immediately in front of what is now the entrance to the old Duncan Home (Burr House) on a tree in the then wilderness. Overlapping land was preempted by John Reed of Maryland, James Galloway, and Samuel Lyon, who claimed as heir of Daniel Lyon.
      Lawrence Protzman (also spelled Sprotzman, Prutzman, etc.) bought a part of Reed's preemption and laid it off into town lots, calling the town Hopewell. In accordance with a request of Protzman the Virginia Assembly passed the following Act October, 1789:
      "Be it enacted, That two hundred and fifty acres of land, at the Court House in Bourbon county, as are laid off into town lots and streets by Lawrence Protzman, the proprietor thereof, shall be established a town by the name of Hopewell, and that Notley Conn, Charles Smith Jr., John Edwards, James Garrard, Edward Waller, Thomas West, James Lanier, James Littell and James Duncan, gentlemen, are hereby constituted trustees thereof."
      This was three years before Kentucky became a state and the great county of Bourbon embraced within her vast boundary thirty-three later Kentucky counties. Hence the little town of Hopewell (changed to Paris in 1790) was the county seat of the fifth county formed in the western territory.

    6. [S126] United States Archives, https://archive.org/stream/genealogicaland00slaugoog/genealogicaland00slaugoog_djvu.txt.
      Elizabeth Marshall, Apr. 17, 1779; children: Thos., Wm., Jno.. Mary, m.
      'McClanahan, Markham, Margaret, m. Snelling; grandchildren: Thos. Smith
      and Wm. Lovell. May 17, 1779.