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Jacob Granville Richards

Jacob Granville Richards[1, 2]

Male 1851 - 1922  (70 years)

Personal Information    |    Media    |    Sources    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Jacob Granville Richards 
    Born 16 Apr 1851  Cecil County, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 11 Jan 1922  Colora, Cecil County, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried 13 Jan 1922  West Nottingham Friends ,Harrisville , Cecil County, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I547449896  My Reynolds Line | Descendants of Henry Reynolds
    Last Modified 30 Jun 2018 

    Father Isaac Stubbs Richards,   b. 7 Sep 1819, Richardsmere, Cecil County, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Apr 1864, Cecil County, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 44 years) 
    Mother Mercy Ann Reynolds,   b. 29 May 1816, Cecil County, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Feb 1885, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years) 
    Married 10 Nov 1813  West Nottingham Friends, Harrisville, Cecil County, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • Isaac Richards died near Rising Sun. Maryland
    Family ID F518494840  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Elizabeth Virginia Langdon,   b. 20 Sep 1846, Cecil County, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Apr 1891, Near Porters Bridge, Cecil County, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 44 years) 
    Married 26 Dec 1872  Harrisville, Cecil County, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Type: By the Rev. S.A. Galey 
    Children 
     1. William Randolph Richards,   b. 22 Jan 1874, Rising Sun, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Jan 1941, Mt. Alto Hospital, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)
     2. Harry Franklin Richards,   b. 18 Feb 1876, Rising Sun, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Mar 1960, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years)
     3. Joseph Thomas Richards,   b. May 22, 1879, Rising Sun, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Nov 1949, Prob Cecil Co., Maryland or Lancaster, PA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 70 years)
     4. Dr. Granville Hampton Richards, M.D.,   b. 26 Oct 1884, Rising Sun, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 May 1932, Port Deposit, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 47 years)
    Last Modified 29 Jun 2018 
    Family ID F518494847  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Mae Veasey Pennington,   b. 1 Jan 1871, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Aug 1952, Cecil County, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years) 
    Married 8 Jun 1893  604 North Calvert Street, Baltimore, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Type: Thursday-by the Rev. Peregrine Worth 
    Notes 
    • were married by Episcopal minister of the church of the Messiah
    Last Modified 30 Jun 2018 
    Family ID F518494846  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Jacob Granville Richards
    Jacob Granville Richards
    jacob granville richards (mercy ann reynolds-isaac stubbs richards, sr).jpg
    Maryland Inventory of Historic Places Richards Home-Richardsmere, Cecil County, Maryland
    Maryland Inventory of Historic Places Richards Home-Richardsmere, Cecil County, Maryland
    jacob geanville and elizabeth (jennie) richards home (cecil county, md).jpg
    Jacob Granville Richards
    Jacob Granville Richards
    Jacob Granville Richards (ancestry)
    Isaac S. Richards and wife Mercy and children
    Isaac S. Richards and wife Mercy and children
    isaac richards and mercy ann reynolds fanily.jpg

    Documents
    Jacob Granville Richards
    Jacob Granville Richards
    Maryland State Archives
    Funeral Announcement-Cecil Whig newspaper of Jacob Granville Richards
    Funeral Announcement-Cecil Whig newspaper of Jacob Granville Richards
    jacob granville richards-funeral announcement.jpg
    Cecil Whig Newspaper May 20, 1892
    Cecil Whig Newspaper May 20, 1892
    Article on J.G. Richards
    Historic Description of the Home of Isaac Richards
    Historic Description of the Home of Isaac Richards
    home of mercy ann reynolds and isaac stubbs richards.jpg
    Jacob Granville Richards-Funeral Services
    Jacob Granville Richards-Funeral Services
    The Baltimore Sun
    Jan 14, 1922
    Orphan Court Record for Isaac Stubbs Richards' Orphans
    Orphan Court Record for Isaac Stubbs Richards' Orphans
    isaac stubbs richards-mercy reynolds will 1.jpg
    Mae Pennington Richards-Obit
    Mae Pennington Richards-Obit
    The Sheboygan Press
    Aug 18, 1952
    Dr. Granville Hampton Richards-Obit
    Dr. Granville Hampton Richards-Obit
    The Baltimore Sun
    May 11, 1932
    Elizabeth V Richards-Killed By A Burgular
    Elizabeth V Richards-Killed By A Burgular
    The Baltimore Sun
    Apr 14, 1891
    Elizabeth V Richards-Funeral Services
    Elizabeth V Richards-Funeral Services
    The News Journal
    Apr 17, 1891

    Headstones
    West Nottingham Friends, Harrisville, Cecil County, Maryland
    West Nottingham Friends, Harrisville, Cecil County, Maryland
    Jacob Granville

    Histories
    Elizabeth V Richards-The Broken Button
    Elizabeth V Richards-The Broken Button
    The Morning News
    Apr 16, 1891
    J Granville Richards-Beaten and Robbed
    J Granville Richards-Beaten and Robbed
    The Baltimore Sun
    Dec 29, 1885
    The Richards Murder-Man Charged With 5 Year Old Crime
    The Richards Murder-Man Charged With 5 Year Old Crime
    The Baltimore Sun
    Aug 3, 1896
    William R Richards-Two Robbers Shot
    William R Richards-Two Robbers Shot
    The Baltimore Sun
    Nov 4, 1898
    Richard's Oak Tree
    Richard's Oak Tree
    The Baltimore Sun
    May 14, 1905

  • Sources 
    1. [S37] Death Certificate.

    2. [S47] Newspaper Article.

    3. [S160] Correspondence, Michael McLaughlin gmom.mcl@gmail.com via p3plcpnl0908.prod.phx3.secureserver.net .
      CONOWINGO ? The historic area of Richardsmere, later known as Porter?s Bridge, took its name from the Richards family, Quakers who settled there in the 1700s. Prominent, well-educated and highly thought of, they contributed to the communities of the sixth district as doctors, engineers, lawyers and businessmen.

      Jacob Granville Richards, a son of Isaac Richards, having married Elizabeth Virginia ?Jennie? Langdon in 1872 took possession of the family seat and over a period of years fathered four sons. He supported his family with the family farm and by operating a store nearby. In 1886, he won a seat in the Maryland legislature ? but that would turn out to be a brief chapter in Richards? life. By July of 1886, the legislature in recess, Granville was appointed to a position at the Customs House in Baltimore. He boarded in Baltimore during the week, coming home Saturday mornings, to return early on Mondays.

      Very early on the morning of April 13, 1891, Mrs. Richards was roused by a sound in their bedroom. Waking her husband, she whispered that she thought someone was in the room. He grabbed a pistol kept on the windowsill next to the bed and called out, ?Who?s there? Speak or I?ll shoot!? A shot rang out from the foot of the bed, and Jennie, who evidently had begun to rise, fell back on to her pillow, her legs slung over the side of the bed.

      The shooter fled and Richards followed, encountering someone in the hallway whom he thought was coming from his sons? room. ?Willie, is that you?? he asked, only to be answered by a shot and a struggle which ended when the invader threw Granville down the stairs and fired at him once again before fleeing. The shots wakened the sons and brought them and the Richards? houseguest, Jennie?s sister-in-law Mrs. Langdon, from their rooms. Sons Willie, 17, and Harry, 15, were sent to rouse the neighbors for help and medical assistance after helping Granville back up the stairs. Jennie was found unconscious with blood on her pillow.

      What a scene of terrible chaos the old house must have witnessed as neighbors arrived to help and two area doctors, Dr. Charles Turner and Dr. R.R. Crothers came to tend the wounded. Someone took charge of the two younger boys, Joseph, 11, and Hampton, 6, who was sleeping between his parents during the awful commotion. Richards was found to have sustained two bullet wounds. Jennie Richards had been shot in the head, the bullet entering behind her right ear. She died around 6 a.m. never having regained consciousness.

      When the authorities arrived, they found the house in disarray, most of the rooms having been rifled, the floors littered with matches that the burglars had used to light the way as they searched for valuables. Outside, a ladder rested against the house, though it was not used to access the house as the windowsill of the room where it rested was covered with flowerpots inside. Instead the cellar door was forced open to permit the miscreants entry. Also found on the grounds were footprints in the soft earth, the larger set a size 10, the smaller a size 6.

      Within a few hours, a witness had come forward to report that he had encountered two men on the road in the area around midnight, a large man and one quite small, who had made him uneasy, feeling that they were considering robbing him. The smaller fellow wore a derby hat and the larger man a hat with the crown indented. Though there must have been men everywhere answering the descriptions with hats of these types, this information became very important in the course of the investigation.

      In the days to follow, a feeling just short of panic seems to have enveloped the sixth district. Men with unsavory reputations are rounded up for questioning. Two men, ?Dr.? George Bram, who appears to have been a local con artist practiced at selling fake medicines, and Frank Ferguson, were arrested, but released a few days later when their alibis check out. It is speculated that a gang of robbers is involved.

      Meanwhile, Granville Richards? brother, Joseph T., assistant chief engineer with the Pennsylvania Railroad, brings in a Pennsylvania Railroad detective, C.G. Ottey, to investigate. Rewards amounting to $1,000 are offered by the Rising Sun Detectives Association and the county commissioners for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the killers. The railroad detective has suspects matching the descriptions, even down to the hats, in mind already, and efforts are made to track the men down.

      The Richards family was forced to adapt to a new and unfamiliar state of normality. Granville returned to work in May, but sold off personal possessions intending to relocate elsewhere, then abandoned that idea to take the two younger boys with him to board in Baltimore, and renting out the Richardsmere house. By the end of the year, he had reconsidered, and returned to the area, renting a house owned by Dr. George Dare. The case was in a state of flux too, as by April 1892, with no headway made, a Detective Lyons of the Baltimore firm of Smith, Pierson and West was engaged to pursue leads and the county commissioners raised the reward to $3,000 on the recommendation of the grand jury. On April 23, 1892, a committee of persons residing in the sixth district published a notice of support for Granville Richards in the Cecil Whig. Apparently the rumor mill was grinding away, and within some quarters there was speculation that Richards himself was the guilty party.

      Shortly thereafter, a break in the case occurred, when two men that Pinkerton detectives had been following since the murder were arrested: one in Rochester, N.Y., and one in Philadelphia. These were the two men that railroad detective Ottey suspected and had been trying to locate, mainly, apparently, because he knew them and knew they fit the descriptions. George Fenner and James Wood were extradited to Elkton.

      Fenner first had to stand trial for burglary and attempted murder of a policeman in Philadelphia, but at last he arrived in the county and a hearing was set. But after two or three days of testimony, it was evident that Fenner had an alibi ? he was in Altoona, Pa., when the murder occurred. The sheriff at the time, J. Albert Boyd, was sent to Altoona to verify that the alibi was genuine and that the people providing it were respectable. That having been ascertained, Fenner was freed. The fate of Wood is unknown and he is not mentioned again. After the enormous buildup since the arrests in May it must have been incredibly frustrating to concede defeat and release the men in July.


      Shortly after the conclusion of the hearing, the commissioners withdrew the reward and decreed that no further monies would be expended on the investigation. The case is considered closed.

      The following year, in June 1893, Granville Richards married the niece of the landlady of his boarding house in Baltimore, Mae Pennington. Born in Cecil County, it was noted by the Cecil Whig that Miss Pennington ?is considerably younger than Mr. Richards.? They acquired a house in Baltimore, and return to the family home on weekends. They started their own family, and presumably life for Richards reached a normality that it had not experienced since April 13, 1891.

      But in August 1896, a local shady character comes forward to report that two men he knows confessed to him that they had done the murder. Benjamin Franklin Jordan claimed that John G. Garver and James Adams revealed their culpability when Jordan met them on the road from Rising Sun just before daylight on the fateful day. Though both men were arrested and the claim investigated, no one in authority placed much faith in it as Jordan was known to sometimes implicate people, against whom he had a grudge, in local crimes. Subsequently, both Garver and Adams were released.

      This was the last gasp of a crime that affected not only one family, but an entire community. Granville Richards went on to spend 36 years at the Customs House. He died on Jan. 11, 1922, the year after he retired. At that time, he and his second wife returned to the family home at Richardsmere. His little son, Hampton, who was in the bed with his parents during the burglary and murder, grew up to be a doctor, and to found the Richards Hospital in Port Deposit. One wonders if his choice of profession was influenced by the dreadful tragedy he experienced as a child.

    4. [S150] Photograph, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/53625765/jacob-granville-richards.
      Jacob Granville Richards
      Birth 16 Apr 1851
      Death 11 Jan 1922 (aged 70)
      Burial
      Harrisville Friends Cemetery
      Harrisville, Cecil County, Maryland