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Sarah Breckenridge[1, 2]

Female 1698 - 1794  (96 years)


Personal Information    |    Media    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Sarah Breckenridge 
    • d/o Alexander Breckinridge of Ireland, and Tavern Keeper in Augusta Co., VA
    Born 1698  Antrim, Northern Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    Died 1794  Augusta County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I19108  My Reynolds Line
    Last Modified 6 May 2019 

    Father Alexander Breckenridge,   b. 1670, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1743, Staunton, Augusta Co., Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years) 
    Mother Jane Preston,   b. 1690, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1743, Staunton, Augusta Co., Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 53 years) 
    Family ID F7605  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Captain Robert the Founder Immigrant McClanahan,   b. Abt 1710, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1794, Staunton, Augusta County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 84 years) 
    Married 1739  Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. Leut. Col. Alexander 'Breckenridge' McClanahan,   b. 1734, Antrim, Ulster Province, IRELAND Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 May 1797, Augusta County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 63 years)
    +2. Captain Robert 'Breckenridge' McClanahan,   b. 19 Apr 1747, Augusta County, Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Oct 1774, Point Pleasant, Mason Co., Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 27 years)
    +3. Capt. John 'Breckenridge' McClanahan,   b. 7 Nov 1742, Augusta County, Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Jun 1774  (Age 31 years)
     4. Jane 'Jenny' McClanahan,   b. 8 Dec 1740, Augusta County, Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     5. Agnes 'Breckenridge' McClanahan,   b. Est 1739, Augusta, Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     6. William 'Breckenridge' McClanahan,   b. 1749, Augusta County, Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     7. Mary 'Polly' McClanahan,   b. Abt 1740, Augusta County, Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 27 Jul 2020 
    Family ID F7084  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Documents
    Virginia Magazine of History and Biography Volume IV
Defense of Col. Edward Hill
Archibald Wood
    Virginia Magazine of History and Biography Volume IV Defense of Col. Edward Hill Archibald Wood
    01-15-2019-009.pdf

    Histories
    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography Vol.XXVII
The Breckenridge Family
    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography Vol.XXVII The Breckenridge Family
    01-15-2019-004.pdf

  • Notes 
    • Sarah Breckinridge, the wife of Robert McClanahan was, according to tradition, a woman of very strong mind, and her company was much sought by the most cultivated people of her day. Her father was a staunch Presbyterian.

  • Sources 
    1. [S82] Wikitree, https://www.werelate.org/wiki/Person:Sarah_Breckenridge_%288%29.
      Sarah Breckenridge[ABT 1710-1794] Augusta Co., VA
      Robert McClanahan BEF 1714-abt 1791
      Children:
      Lt. Col. Alexander McClanahan, ABT 1734-1797
      Agnes McClanahan, BT 1735 -
      Sarah McClanahan, 736-1750 -
      Lettice 'Lettis' McClanahan, 736-1750 -
      Jane "Jenny" McClanahan, 740 -
      Capt. John McClanahan, Sr., 1742 - 1774
      Mary 'Polly' McClanahan, BEF 1744 -
      Capt. Robert McClanahan, 1747 - 1774
      William McClanahan, 1748/49 -

    2. [S107] Family Histories, http://people.virginia.edu/~rtg2t/kin/data/Kith.and.Kin.txt.
      THE BRECKINRIDGE LINE

      Sarah, wife of Robert M'Clanahan, already married when they came to America, was the daughter of Alexander Brackenridge; for so he writes his name in the deed made in 1740, which I saw at the City Hall, Philadelphia, and which says he was removing to Virginia; the Ridge where grew the Bracken great, fern like, as in so many I have seen in Scotland.
      Driven by persecution from Ayrshire, Scotland, under Charles II to North of Ireland, among the 'Landholders' on the Hamilton Estate in Ulster, 1681, there was a Gilbert Brakenrig, who might have been the father of Alexander, who came to Pennsylvania in 1728, and on May 22, 1740, at Orange Court, among fourteen heads of families 'proved his importation' with wife and eight children, the same day with Robert M'Clanahan, his son-in-law. He was appointed August 11, 1741, by the people of Tinkling Spring Church, with four others, to 'manage their public affairs.' His widow, Janet, 'in open court May 24, 1744, relinquished her right to administer on his estate to her oldest son, George.' There were two older half brothers: Adam, Deputy Sheriff under his brother-in-law, Robert M'Clanahan, November 28, 1749, and John. Younger children were Robert, Smith, Sarah (Mrs. Robert M'Clanahan) and Letitia, wife of Elijah M'Clanahan Robert's brother. From Robert, who married first his first cousin, Sarah Poage, descend Ripleys, of Kentucky, and the two famous daughters of Shakespeare Caldwell and Eliza Breckinridge, great-granddaughter of Alexander, the good old Elder of Tinkling Spring: 'enough to make him turn over in his grave.' For the two Caldwell girls were educated in a convent, and became ardent Romanists. Their great wealth enabled them to build and endow the 'Catholic University' at Washington. Their money also probably accounted for the marriage of the older, Mary Gwendoline Caldwell, to the Marquis des Monstriers-M?rinville, and of the younger Eliza Lina to Baron von Zedwitz. Neither marriage was happy, and I think there were no children of the Marquise. Since writing this, the daily papers tell of the effort of young Baron von Zedwitz, a German officer in the World War, to recover his mother's American property.
      The two sisters were dominated by the priests until their later years, when they broke with them, and seemed to turn back to the faith of their fathers. One of them wrote a book which I have, 'The Double Policy of the Papacy.' At her death I saw in the Baltimore Sun that she 'died in the bosom of Mother Church,' and that she was insane when she wrote her book! which had the honor of being placed in the Index Expurgatorius by the Pope. From Robert, also, by his second wife, Letitia Preston, descended Vice-President John C. Breckinridge, Hon. W. C. P. Breckinridge, the 'silver-tongued orator'; Clifton Breckinridge, Minister to Russia, who married your father's friend, Kate Carson; Rev. Dr. Robert J. Breckinridge; Rev. Dr. Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield, of Princeton Seminary; Judge Samuel Miller Breckinridge whose splendid life of service came to its end on the floor of the General Assembly while speaking; and other notables, brilliant men and charming women. Among the latter were the three fascinating daughters of Frances Breckinridge and Rev. John Clark Young, who married Rev. Dr. Gelon H. Rout, Rev. Dr. Rutherford Douglas and Rev. Dr. E. Rutherford. Carolina, sister of Mrs. Young, married Rev. Dr. Bullock, the welcome witty guest in my father's house. Once when my mother gave a breakfast party for him, with D. D.'s and reverends and divinity students for guests from the University, the conversation turned on ministers' wives, and Dr. Bullock urged my mother to find a wife for one of the guests, an incorrigible bachelor. She described two sisters, their intellectual attainments, their social position, their excellence in all housewifely arts, their devotion to the Church, their comfortable patrimony. Dr. Bullock with his urbane bow, 'What a wonderful catalogue, Mrs. Woods, but I notice one item you have emitted; may I ask, Are they comely?' It brought down the house. 'Oh you preachers!' said my mother.

    3. [S82] Wikitree, https://www.werelate.org/wiki/Person:Sarah_Breckenridge_%288%29.
      Sarah Breckenridge[ABT 1710-1794] Augusta Co., VA
      Robert McClanahan BEF 1714-abt 1791
      Children:
      Lt. Col. Alexander McClanahan, ABT 1734-1797
      Agnes McClanahan, BT 1735 -
      Sarah McClanahan, 736-1750 -
      Lettice 'Lettis' McClanahan, 736-1750 -
      Jane "Jenny" McClanahan, 740 -
      Capt. John McClanahan, Sr., 1742 - 1774
      Mary 'Polly' McClanahan, BEF 1744 -
      Capt. Robert McClanahan, 1747 - 1774
      William McClanahan, 1748/49 -
      https://www.werelate.org/wiki/Early_Settlers_of_Augusta_County%2C_Virginia_-_Surnames_K-O
      ? -Mc-

      Robert McClanahan (Beverley Manor NW, 331 acres from Wm. Beverley, 27 May 1741, on record in Orange County, VA from "The McClanahans", by H.M. White, Stone Printing & Mfg., 1894)

      Robert McClanahan (Beverley Manor, from Wm. Beverley, 340 acres in Beverley Manor; Lewis Creek, Brackenridge, crossing Ramsey's Branch, 17 June 1748 from Chalkley's) and (Beverley Patent NE, 216 acres)

      Robert McClanahan, Gent. (acres not listed, on Christie's Creek, Beverley Manor, from Chalkley's, 27 Feb. 1749) and (1/2 acre lot in Staunton, Lot No. 5, Corner Preston's land. "Livery by turf and twig", from Chalkley's, 27 Feb. 1749)

    4. [S93] Sons of the American Revolution, https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/2204/32596_242241-00180/547552?backurl=https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/person/tree/40381966/person/19695484155/facts/citation/147704828296/edit/record#?imageId=32596_242241-00180.
      U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970
      Name: Alexander McClanahan
      SAR Membership 44885
      Role Ancestor
      Application Date
      Robert McClomahan, wife, Sarah Breckenridge
      Spouse [Eleanor] Shelton
      Children: Letitia McClomahan, m. Morris Austin
      Others in Record
      Lyle Austin Smith, [Applicant], s/o
      Julia Austin - Abraham Smith, s/o
      Alexander McClanahan Austin - Mary Lyle Hunter s/o
      Morris Austin - Lettia McClanahan, s/o
      Alexander McClanahan - Shelton [Eleanor], s/o
      Robert McClanahan - Sarah Breckenridge
      Lieutenant Colonel of Smith's Regiment of Virginia Volunteers; Commissioned Lt. Col. of 7th Regiment Virginia at outbreak of war and served as such through war.

    5. [S100] Internet Source, http://www.archive.org/stream/mcclanahans00whitgoog/mcclanahans00whitgoog_djvu.txt.
      Robert McClanahan came to Augusta County from Ireland. The time of his coming has not been certainly determined, but it was at an early day. His deed to three hundred and thirty-one acres of land by William Beverly, dated May 27, 1741, is on record in Orange Courthouse, Virginia. There was no clerk's office, in Augusta County, until 1745. His wife, Sarah Breckinridge, was daughter of Alexander Breckinridge, who came to America from the North of Ireland in 1728, and removed from Pennsylvania to a farm near the present site of Staunton, in Augusta County, Virginia. Robert McClanahan died in 1791, at his home, one mile south of Staunton, on what is known now as the Greenville road. He was, therefore, "the emigrant and founder." His children were Alexander, John, Robert and William (sons); with Mrs. St. Clair, Mrs. Dean, Mrs. Poage and Mrs. Keiser (daughters). It is a little doubtful whether Mrs. Poage was daughter or granddaughter of Robert, the first; but the evidence for the former is very strong.

      Mr. Frederick Johnston, in his " Memorials of Virginia Clerks" (page 52), says that "Robert McClanahan, throughout his whole life, was 'a prominent man, "From, the "Annals of Augusta County," by Waddell, we learn that he acted in
      various public capacities during his life. Quoting from the records of the county, Waddell writes as follows: "August 22, 1748, it appears that John Lewis had contracted to erect the public buildings of the parish for ^148.
      * * * From a bond executed by Colonel Lewis, with Robert McClanahan as security,
      * * * it appears that one of the buildings was a dwelling house for the parish minister."
      * * * "November 28, 1749, a commission to Robert McClnahan, gent., to be sheriff of this county during his majesty's pleasure, was produced in court," etc. Adam Breckinridge, son of Alexander Breckinridge, who was founder of the distinguished family of that name in this county, and brother- in-law of McClanahan, "qualified as deputy sheriff." "Annals, page 41.
      Establishes further evidence of the familial relationships with the Lewis' and McClanahans.

      "November 28, 1749, a commission to Robert McClnahan, gent., to be sheriff of this county during his majesty's pleasure, was produced in court," etc. Adam Breckinridge, son of Alexander Breckinridge, who was founder of the distinguished family of that name in this county, and brother-in-law of McClanahan, "qualified as deputy sheriff." "Annals, page 41."
      In 1750, the County Clerk employed Andrew Lewis as surveyor, to lay off twenty-five acres in town lots. The court appointed Andrew Lewis, Robert McClanahan, and Robert Breckinridge, commissioners to convey the lots to purchasers. Robert McClanahan purchased two half-acre lots for 2. 10 s. "Annal3 y pages 4.5, 4.6."

    6. [S32] Find-A-Grave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/145158616.
      Robert McClenachan, Sr. came to America with his brother Elijah, arriving with his future father-in-law, Alexander BRECKENRIDGE - they arrived in Philadelphia around 1727-1728. There are very few records at this time regarding their stay in Pennsylvania, however, there was a document in Philadelphia City Hall indicating that Robert Sr. moved to Virginia. And there is a record of Robert marrying Sarah BRECKENRIDGE in Bucks County, Pennsylvania in 1738.

      Robert Sr. and Elijah MCCLENACHAN went to Augusta County, Virginia and were among the early pioneers of that county along with many of the BRECKENRIDGES, CUNNINGHAMS, LEWIS', STUARTS, MONTGOMERYS and POAGES. Records do show that Robert Sr. proved his importation in the Orange County (VA) Courthouse on 22 March 1740, the same day his father-in-law Alexander BRECKENRIDGE proved his importation. Proving importation was necessary in order to purchase land. Shortly thereafter, Robert Sr. purchased 331 acres from the William BEVERLY Manor. The deed was recorded 27 May 1741, at the Orange County Courthouse. Robert Sarah received a number of land grants from the BEVERLY Land Grant Tract and settled in Staunton, Augusta County.

      Robert was very active in Augusta Co. In 1743 he received a license to open an "Ordinary", which is defined as a public house where food is served to the public. The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography", Oct. 1899, describes "his log cabin hostelry was across the street from the courthouse. We may imagine the scene in the dining room on a court day. The dinner table was spread in this big room, and was composed of several split logs put together, and guests sat on benches constructed in like manner. The food was brought to the table in pewter or wooden platters and consisted probably of beef, certainly pork and venison, and possibly of bear meat; with cabbage, potatoes, and turnips, one or all. If Colonel LEWIS's mill was then grinding, corn dodgers were supplied for bread, otherwise there was only hominy; no knives or forks were furnished, but each guest whipped out his jack knife and helped himself as best he could, fingers being freely used. The charge for the meal, as fixed by the court, was 12 1/2 cents, coffee was not known, but liquors of several kinds were at hand, and at surprisingly low prices, according to the established rates--rum$1.30 per gallon, whiskey $1.00 per gallon, and claret 83 1/2 cents per quart, whatever else the people did without, they managed by some means to obtain liquors; such is the native depravity of man! But as far as we know, intemperance was not prevalent."

      Robert Sr. was in Capt. John CHRISTIAN's company of Augusta Co., militia in 1742. He was Sheriff of the county about 1765. Appeared at a vestry meeting as Attorney-in-fact for Rev. John JONES, Rector. Aug. 1761, Robert convicted of selling liquor without a license. Oct. 8, 1771, verdict returned against Robert (at age 73) for Trespass and Assault and Battery. Cost 50 shillings. Robert bought and sold many parcels of land in and around Staunton, Virginia.

      Robert MCCLENACHAN Sr. and Sarah BRECKENRIDGE had seven children: Alexander, Mary "Polly" Agnes, Jane "Jean", John, Letitia Esther, Robert Jr. and William.

      Robert Sr. died in 1791 in Augusta Co. Virginia.

      - Excerpted from "The McClanahans", by H.M.White and "The McClenahan Family", by James R. McClenahan -

    7. [S245] Vital Record (Ancestry), https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=VaRecords_ga&h=79741&indiv=try&o_vc=Record:OtherRecord&rhSource=2204.
      Name: Robert McClenachan
      Date: 7 Jun 1791
      Location: Augusta Co., VA
      Notes: This probate record was originally published in "Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement in Virginia, 1745-1800. Extracted from the Original Court Records of Augusta County" by Lyman Chalkley.
      Remarks: Robert McClenachans will-To wife Sarah; to daughters, Agnes Dean, Jene Sinclair, Lettis Kizer; to son, Alexander, plantation in Rockbridge whereon Robert Shaw lives; to grandsons, John and Robert McClenachan, sons of son Robert McClenachan, deceased
      Description: Decedent's Son
      Book: WB7-434
      Prove Date:
      1 Dec 1791

    8. [S100] Internet Source, https://www.werelate.org/wiki/Early_Settlers_of_Augusta_County%2C_Virginia_-_Surnames_K-O.
      Robert McClanahan (Beverley Manor NW, 331 acres from Wm. Beverley, 27 May 1741, on record in Orange County, VA from "The McClanahans", by H.M. White, Stone Printing & Mfg., 1894)

      Robert McClanahan (Beverley Manor, from Wm. Beverley, 340 acres in Beverley Manor; Lewis Creek, Brackenridge, crossing Ramsey's Branch, 17 June 1748 from Chalkley's) and (Beverley Patent NE, 216 acres)

      Robert McClanahan, Gent. (acres not listed, on Christie's Creek, Beverley Manor, from Chalkley's, 27 Feb. 1749) and (1/2 acre lot in Staunton, Lot No. 5, Corner Preston's land. "Livery by turf and twig", from Chalkley's, 27 Feb. 1749)

    9. [S107] Family Histories, http://people.virginia.edu/~rtg2t/kin/data/Kith.and.Kin.txt.
      THE McCLANAHAN LINE

      The mother of Anne Poage Woods was Agnes McClanahan, daughter of Robert McClanahan, who came with so many others about 1740. His deed to 331 acres is dated May 27, 1741, at Orange Court House; no county enacted until 1738, and no clerk's office, of Augusta; no "sufficient number of competent men," until 1743. Col. John Lewis has him security for a bond August 22, 1748. November 28, 1748, 'was produced in court, Commission to Robert McClanahan, Gent. to be Sheriff of this (Augusta) County during his Majesty's pleasure.' In the French and Indian War, 1755, Gov. Dinwiddie writes him and David Stuart to treat with friendly Cherokees against Shawnees. There were three brothers of Robert: Blair and James who remained in Pennsylvania, and Elijah. Blair became a wealthy merchant; Rev. Saml. McLanahan, of Baltimore, is from him. James (who followed the frequent custom of the day in varied spelling, I have seen five in one family deed), McClannaghan had a son who married Isabella Craig, of Cecil County, Md.; their son, James, married Elizabeth Boggs; five children; the oldest, J. King McLenahan, Hollidaysburg, Pa., father of E. Johnston McLenahan and of Isabella, Mrs. George Brown, who built Brown Memorial, Baltimore, where we have worshipped so often. Elijah had a daughter, Mrs. Jane Holliday, of Winchester, Va. (perhaps greatgrandmother of the governor). He wrote November 25, 1789, about her 'rising family' and to bid her a 'last farewell,' a very old man. Elijah and Alexander McClanahan were on the Court 1781 to try two 'disloyal persons' after the war; Elijah was foreman of the Court which had in it also an uncle, a nephew, a brother-in-law and two others of the family! Elijah was one of the first trustees of the City of Staunton and one of the freeholders demanding in October, 1776, Religious Liberty, equality for 'all religious denominations within the Dominion.'
      Robert McClanahan and Sarah Breckinridge had eight children: 1. Alexander married Miss Shelton, sister of Patrick Henry's first wife. He was captain in Bouquet's Expedition, and at Point Pleasant; as also his brother, John, a lieutenant, who married Margaret Lewis.
      3. Robert, Jr., captain, killed at Point Pleasant; two sons moved to Kentucky.
      4. William lived in Roanoke County at the 'Big Lick,' where the deer used to come for the salty taste of the rock and clay, beside the Big Spring. It now supplies with its crystal flow the great city of Roanoke, built on the plantation of Wm.'s family, thereby made wealthy. They are all active in Church matters, leaders in good works, especially the good Elder William S. McClanahan and his sisters. One of them was the wife of Rev. Dr. Pitzer, another married Rev. Dr. Henry Martyn White, to whose brochure 'the M?Clanahans' I owe much of this account; their son is Rev. Hugh White, of China.
      From Wm.'s son, Col. Elijah and his wife, Agatha Lewis, are Rev. Wm. McC. Miller and his sons, Rev. W. McC., Jr., and Dr. Houston Miller, missionary to China.
      5. Jane married John Boys; her daughter, Kitty, was the mother of Mr. Jos. Addison Waddell, author of 'Annals of Augusta County,' from which much of my definite information about Augusta has been obtained.
      6. Mrs. Dean.
      7. Agnes married Thomas Poage.

    10. [S245] Vital Record (Ancestry), https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/48370/IndexQueriesPA-003799-234/315488?backurl=https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/person/tree/78411138/person/46402609110/facts/citation/323510144255/edit/record#?imageId=IndexQueriesPA-003987-422.
      Everyname Index to Egle's Notes and Queries Chiefly Relating to Interior of Pennsylvania
      Fourth Series, Volume 1 and 2, Page 422
      McLanahan, Blair, 1:282
      McLanahan, Robert, 1:282
      McLanahan, Sarah Breckendridge, 1:282

    11. [S130] Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elijah_McClanahan.
      Bibliography

      Breckenbridge, James. 1783-1904. Papers. Abstract: Correspondence (chiefly relating to Breckinridge's legal career and his land speculation in western Virginia and Kentucky), legal papers, deeds, militia orders and returns, receipts, accounts, and other papers. Includes description of iron works in Wythe County, Va., Mutual Assurance Society receipts, and rates charged by ordinary keepers (1770). Topics mentioned in correspondence include Virginia and U.S. politics, local elections, War of 1812, settlement of Kentucky and Tennessee, Indian wars, slavery, and Virginia militia, with specific references to formation of Kentucky government, congressional sessions of 1793-1797 and 1805-1812, the Kentucky Resolutions (1798), troubles with squatters in Indian territory, expeditions against Indians (1791 and 1813), collection of whiskey taxes, excise taxes, the national bank, internal improvements, trial of Aaron Burr, mill owned by Breckinridge, and support of two illegitimate children. Correspondents include John Breckinridge, Robert Breckinridge, William Breckinridge, Henry Clay, Francis Walker Gilmer, Peachy R. Gilmer, George Hancock, Andrew Jackson, James Madison, John Marshall, Elijah McClanahan, James McClung, Francis Preston, John Preston, William Preston, Martha Jefferson Randolph, Archibald Stuart, and Bushrod Washington.
      National Register of Historic Places Registration Form. "Villa Heights".
      Roanoke Times. March 20, 2018. "Historic mansion in northwest Roanoke added to state landmarks register."
      White, H. M. The McClanahans. 1716. Abstract: Family history and genealogy compiled by White of the McClanahans, a Scotch-Irish family that settled in Virginia after 1716. The book describes the family's involvement in the French and Indian War and the Revolutionary War. Included is information on the Poage family.
      References

      "William McLenachan's Will, 1820." Kegley, F. B. Kegley's Virginia Frontier: The Beginning of the Southwest, the Roanoke of Colonial Days, 1740-1783, with Maps and Illustrations. Roanoke, Virginia: Southwest Virginia Historical Society, 1938. Pages 532-533.
      Summers, Lewis Preston, George W. L. Bickley, and Charles B. Coale. Annals of Southwest Virginia, 1769-1800. Baltimore, Maryland: Clearfield Company, 1929. Page 383.
      Summers, Lewis Preston, George W. L. Bickley, and Charles B. Coale. Annals of Southwest Virginia, 1769-1800. Baltimore, Maryland: Clearfield Company, 1929. Page 448.
      White, H. M. The McClanahans. 1894. [1] Chapter IV. Also pages 40-42. Roanoke, Virginia. The Stone Printing and Manufacturing Company. 1894.
      Summers, Lewis Preston, George W. L. Bickley, and Charles B. Coale. Annals of Southwest Virginia, 1769-1800. Baltimore, Maryland: Clearfield Company, 1929. Page 462.
      Writers' Program (U.S.). Roanoke, Story of County and City. [Roanoke]: [Stone Print. and manufacturing Co.], 1942. Page 330.
      Findagrave.com
      Summers, Lewis Preston, George W. L. Bickley, and Charles B. Coale. Annals of Southwest Virginia, 1769-1800. Baltimore, Maryland: Clearfield Company, 1929. Page 934.
      Kagey, Deedie Dent. When Past Is Prologue: A History of Roanoke County. Roanoke, Va: Roanoke County Sesquicentennial Committee, 1988. Page 132..
      Kagey, Deedie Dent. When Past Is Prologue: A History of Roanoke County. Roanoke, Va: Roanoke County Sesquicentennial Committee, 1988. Page 106.
      Cox, Ray. 2017. Early Roanoke County founder rests at well-groomed gravesite. Roanoke Times. Apr 10, 2017.
      Kagey, Deedie Dent. When Past Is Prologue: A History of Roanoke County. Roanoke, Va: Roanoke County Sesquicentennial Committee, 1988. Page 705.
      Kagey, Deedie Dent. When Past Is Prologue: A History of Roanoke County. Roanoke, Va: Roanoke County Sesquicentennial Committee, 1988. Page 107.
      Virginia. Alleghany Turnpike Company Records. 1847.
      Roanoke Times. March 20, 2018. "Historic mansion in northwest Roanoke added to state landmarks register."
      National Register of Historic Places Registration Form. "Villa Heights". Section 7, page 5.
      Findagrave.com
      Bibliography

    12. [S84] Rootsweb, http://sites.rootsweb.com/~vaaugust/photo.html.
      Tinkling Spring Photo Album
      Deeply imbedded in the history of the settlement of Augusta County is Tinkling Spring Church. The first settlers from the north were John Lewis who arrive in 1732 and William Beverley who was given a large land grant in 1736. The Scotch-Irish Presbyterians who followed lost no time in forming the Triple Forks of the Shenandoah Congregation and in petitioning the Donegal Presbytery for the services of a minister. Two centers of worship developed--Tinkling Spring and the Augusta Stone Meeting Houses. These pictures are from Howard McKnight Wilson's The Tinkling Spring: Headwater of Freedom, A study of the Church and Her People, 1732-1952, permission granted by Tinkling Spring Church.
      Tinkling Spring Church was officially founded in 1740. The first meeting house was a log cabin measuring twenty-four by fifty feet. The floor plan shows seating arrangement and pew rent. The small pulpit was located along the west wall. The interior was severely simple and the floor was the ground over which the the sanctuary was constructed. The pews were simple benches without backs, probably made of split logs.
      This monument, which stands outside the Fellowship Hall, reads, "Sacred to the Memory of the Immigrants to this valley who turned the wilderness into habitations." It lists the names of the original members who were assessed twelve shillings each to build the first meeting house. Administratively, the membership was divided into three Quarters headed by John Christian, William Wright, and John Finley. Christian's quarter included families named Black, Cowin, Wilson, Long, Bell, Alexander, Stewart, Patton, Hall, Robison, Cristian, Davison, McCollock, Caldwell, Armstrong, Rutledge, Henderson, Conegham, Thomson, Scott, Gamel, Ramsey, Preston, Maxwell, McDonal, Russell, Lewis, Hutchison, McClanahan, Brackenridge, and McCollock. Wright's quarter included families named Smith Hutchison, Palmer, Thomson, Moday, Frazer, Johnston, Logan, Henderson, Scileran, Black, Cear, McCune, Fergeson, and Wright. Finley's quarter included families named McClure, Turk, Gay, Finley, McCollock, Gelaspey, Edmiston, Campbell, Stewart, Peterson, Cear, Tays, Steel, and White. (Photo courtesy of Ellen L. Moffett)
      Interest in building a new meeting house began in 1777 when the subscribers agreed to pay the costs. However, completion of the building was delayed by the war and it wasn't until about 1792 that the Stone Sanctuary shown here was completed.
      The present church building was erected in 1849 and remodeled in 1916.

      The statue of Pioneer Woman was chosen by Howard McKnight Wilson as the Frontispiece in his The Tinkling Spring: Headwater of Freedom, A study of the Church and Her People, 1732-1952.