Visitor feedback is helping us continue improving the accuracy, documentation and overall quality of our database. Contributions are helping maintain our new, faster server.


Thank You All, We'll Keep You Posted!

Thank you for visiting our heritage and history.
Please consider making a contribution (any amount is appreciated) to help offset the expense, and help us continually improve the quality and quantity of information.

   Last Name:   First Name:
. Log In
Join Our Community
What's New
Most Wanted
Surnames
Advanced Search
Terms of Use & Privacy
Contact Us
Database Statistics
Bookmarks

Prudence Clayton[1, 2]

Female 1657 - 1727  (~ 69 years)


Personal Information    |    Media    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Prudence Clayton 
    Born Rumbaldswick Parish, Sussex, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Christened 20 Oct 1657  Lewes, Chichester Sussex, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    Died 4 Feb 1727  Chester, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Person ID I10795  My Reynolds Line
    Last Modified 2 Jun 2016 

    Father William Clayton,   b. 1632, Boxgrove Parish, West Sussex, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1689, Marcus Hook, Chester Co., PA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 57 years) 
    Mother Prudence Lansford,   b. Abt 1636 
    Married 7 Nov 1653  Pancras Parish, Chichester, Sussex, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F102631  Group Sheet

    Family Henry Reynolds,   b. 23 Sep 1655, Chichester, Sussex, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Aug 1724, Reynoldsville, Jefferson Co., Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years) 
    Married 10 Nov 1678  Burlington MM, Burlington Co., New Jersey Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • MARRIAGE:NJ Burlington Co.: Church Records Vol 1, Early
      Church Records of Burlington County, NJ, Volume I, Meldrum,
      Charlotte D., Westminster, MD: Family Lines Publications,
      1994 -
    Children 
    +1. Henry 'Preacher' Reynolds, Jr.,   b. 16 Aug 1693, Chester County, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Dec 1779, Township of West Nottingham, Chester County, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 86 years)
     2. Margaret Reynolds,   b. 25 May 1680, Chester, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     3. Mary Reynolds,   b. 13 Sep 1682, Chester, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     4. Francis Reynolds,   b. 15 Aug 1684, Chester, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1760, Chichester, Chester Co., Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years)
     5. Prudence Reynolds,   b. 20 Mar 1686, Chester, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     6. Deborah Reynolds,   b. 16 Apr 1689, Chester, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1747  (Age 57 years)
     7. William Reynolds,   b. 30 May 1691, Chester, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Jun 1693, Chester, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 2 years)
    +8. Hannah Reynolds,   b. 11 Nov 1697, Chester, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Mar 1726, Chester, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 28 years)
     9. William of Randolph Co. Reynolds,   b. 5 Jul 1701, Nottingham, Chester, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Jun 1773, Randolph Co., North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years)
     10. John Reynolds,   b. 13 Sep 1695, Chichester, Chester Co., Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1728, Chichester, Chester Co., Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 32 years)
    Last Modified 15 Mar 2017 
    Family ID F3445  Group Sheet

  • Documents
    Will of Prudence Clayton Reynolds
    Will of Prudence Clayton Reynolds
    Chester County Pennsylvania Estate papers 1714-1838
    Ancestry.com
    Will-2
    Will-2
    Prudence Reynolds
    Will-3
    Will-3
    Prudence Reynolds
    Will of Prudence Clayton Reynolds
    Will of Prudence Clayton Reynolds
    Prudence Reynolds
    Quaker Record-Intent to marry
Upper left hand corner
    Quaker Record-Intent to marry Upper left hand corner
    Henry Reynolds-Prudence Clayton
    The Ancestor Roster for the Colonial Dames Seventeenth Century 1915-2005;
    The Ancestor Roster for the Colonial Dames Seventeenth Century 1915-2005;
    _ColDamesAncestorRoster-1.pdf

  • Notes 
    • Pennsylvania Wills, 1682-1834 Reynolds, Prudence
      Chichester. November 17, 1726. April 15, 1728. A. 274.
      To my daughters "as many as shall be in being" all
      household goods. To son Francis, eldest son Henry Reynolds
      one silver cup value 40 shillings. Remainder of estate to
      all children in being, none named. Executor: son Henry
      Reynolds. Witnesses: Robert Howard, Mathew Keasby, John
      Lea.

  • Sources 
    1. [S122] Genealogy. com, http://www.genealogy.com/ftm/a/n/g/Donna-Angelone-ny/GENE2-0004.html.
      Notes for PRUDENCE CLAYTON:
      Prudence CLAYTON born 20 8th month 1657 recorded Lewes and Chichester Monthly Meeting, Sussex, England. Married 10 11th month 1678 Burlington MM, NJ to Henry REYNOLDS (1655-1720) the son of William Reynolds and Margaret Exton. Prudence made her will 17 Nov 1726 at Chichester and died by April 1728. Their children were Margaret Moulder, Mary Reynolds, Francis Reynolds, Prudence Reynolds, Deborah Reynolds, William Reynolds, Henry Reynolds, John Reynolds, Hannah Browne, and William Reynolds Jr.
      he Nottingham area at that time has been described as rich in natural resources, with heavily forested lands and trees that included hickory, chestnut, walnut, and oak. The land was fertile and the streams were said to be clear and vibrant. New economic opportunities were plentiful for new settlers to this area.
      It is believed that two pioneer brothers, James and William Brown, both Quaker ministers, were among the first settlers here. They were sons of Richard and Mary Brown, members of Wellingborough Monthly Meeting in Northamptonshire, England, and apparently had become Friends before they came to America. Tradition has it that the Brown brothers were likely accompanied by several other founding members, including Andrew Job, John Churchman, and Henry Reynolds.
      Nottingham was a frontier village for its first 30 years, while settlers cleared the land and built roads, shops, dwellings, and the Meetinghouse. The Lots were populated by "simple, frugal, and industrious people" who combined farming with one or more of the occupations of that time including milling, blacksmithing, carpentry, clock making, tanning. They raised extensive crops of wheat, corn, and vegetables. Tobacco was not grown here since the soil would not support it.
      The community became highly self-sufficient by the sharing of services, such as home-building, relying very little on outside resources other than perhaps support from the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of Friends.
      The religious and cultural heart of the Nottingham Lots was clearly the East Nottingham Monthly Meeting (or Brick Meetinghouse), which was part of William Penn's original plan. In either 1707 or 1709, a log cabin was built to serve as the first Nottingham Meetinghouse. In 1715, the East Nottingham Monthly Meeting was organizationally affiliated with the Newark Monthly Meeting. In 1718, Brick Meetinghouse was put under the care of New Garden Monthly Meeting after New Garden separated from Newark.
      The original purchasers of lots included the following individuals: Joel Baily, John Bales or Beals, Edward Beeson, James Brown, William Brown, John Churchman, James Cooper, Robert Dutton, Cornelious Empson, Ebeneser Empson, Randal Janney, Andrew Job, Samuel Littler, Henry Reynolds, and John Richardson.
      ttp://www.churchman.org/Nottingham_hist.htm
      Births, Deaths and Marriages of the Nottingham Quakers, 1680-1889 by Alice Beard (Westminster, MD: Family Line Publications, 1989)

    2. [S39] Will, http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&db=chesterwills1713&h=11242&tid=51287999&pid=290005936033&usePUB=true&rhSource=2189.
      Prudence Clayton Reynolds

    3. [S122] Genealogy. com, http://www.genealogy.com/ftm/a/n/g/Donna-Angelone-ny/GENE2-0004.html.
      Notes for PRUDENCE CLAYTON:
      Prudence CLAYTON born 20 8th month 1657 recorded Lewes and Chichester Monthly Meeting, Sussex, England. Married 10 11th month 1678 Burlington MM, NJ to Henry REYNOLDS (1655-1720) the son of William Reynolds and Margaret Exton. Prudence made her will 17 Nov 1726 at Chichester and died by April 1728.[15 Apr 1728] Their children were Margaret Moulder, Mary Reynolds, Francis Reynolds, Prudence Reynolds, Deborah Reynolds, William Reynolds, Henry Reynolds, John Reynolds, Hannah Browne, and William Reynolds Jr.
      he Nottingham area at that time has been described as rich in natural resources, with heavily forested lands and trees that included hickory, chestnut, walnut, and oak. The land was fertile and the streams were said to be clear and vibrant. New economic opportunities were plentiful for new settlers to this area.
      It is believed that two pioneer brothers, James and William Brown, both Quaker ministers, were among the first settlers here. They were sons of Richard and Mary Brown, members of Wellingborough Monthly Meeting in Northamptonshire, England, and apparently had become Friends before they came to America. Tradition has it that the Brown brothers were likely accompanied by several other founding members, including Andrew Job, John Churchman, and Henry Reynolds.
      Nottingham was a frontier village for its first 30 years, while settlers cleared the land and built roads, shops, dwellings, and the Meetinghouse. The Lots were populated by "simple, frugal, and industrious people" who combined farming with one or more of the occupations of that time including milling, blacksmithing, carpentry, clock making, tanning. They raised extensive crops of wheat, corn, and vegetables. Tobacco was not grown here since the soil would not support it.
      The community became highly self-sufficient by the sharing of services, such as home-building, relying very little on outside resources other than perhaps support from the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of Friends.
      The religious and cultural heart of the Nottingham Lots was clearly the East Nottingham Monthly Meeting (or Brick Meetinghouse), which was part of William Penn's original plan. In either 1707 or 1709, a log cabin was built to serve as the first Nottingham Meetinghouse. In 1715, the East Nottingham Monthly Meeting was organizationally affiliated with the Newark Monthly Meeting. In 1718, Brick Meetinghouse was put under the care of New Garden Monthly Meeting after New Garden separated from Newark.
      The original purchasers of lots included the following individuals: Joel Baily, John Bales or Beals, Edward Beeson, James Brown, William Brown, John Churchman, James Cooper, Robert Dutton, Cornelious Empson, Ebeneser Empson, Randal Janney, Andrew Job, Samuel Littler, Henry Reynolds, and John Richardson.
      ttp://www.churchman.org/Nottingham_hist.htm
      Births, Deaths and Marriages of the Nottingham Quakers, 1680-1889 by Alice Beard (Westminster, MD: Family Line Publications, 1989)