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Family: John Langhorne / Mary Beverly (F6129)  [1



Family Information    |    PDF

  • Father | Male
    John Langhorne

    Born  Abt 1695  Warwick, Chesterfield County, Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location
    Died  Abt 1767  Warwick County, Colonial Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location
    Buried     
    Married     
    Father   
    Mother   

    Mother | Female
    Mary Beverly

    Born  28 Jun 1678  Jamestown, Middlesex, Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location
    Died  Bef 1796  King and Queen Co., Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location
    Buried     
    Other Spouse  Private | F6128 
    Married     
    Father  Major Robert Beverly | F5825 Group Sheet 
    Mother  Mary Margaret Boyd | F5825 Group Sheet 

    Child 1 | Female
    + Lockey Langhorne

    Born  Est 1723  York Co., Colonial Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location
    Died  Apr 1792  Prob. Cumberland Co., Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location
    Buried     
    Spouse  Thomas Tabb | F5705 
    Married     

  • Sources 
    1. [S107] Family Histories, http://www.raken.com/american_wealth/planter_aristocrats/langhorne2.asp.
      As the sole heir of John Langhorne, Maurice Langhorne (1670-1698) inherited a huge estate. Around 1690 he married Anne Cary of "The Forest". Anne Cary was the daughter of Capt. Henry Cary, a planter who was well known as the master builder of Williamsburg. The marriage of Maurice Langhorne to Anne Cary was a good one, for the Carys were one of the wealthiest and most influential families in the Virginia Colony. In 1695, Maurice and Anne Langhorne had their only child, whom they named John Langhorne. Within three short years Maurice Langhorne died, and young John was sent to "The Forest" to be raised by his maternal grandparents Henry and Judith Cary. Anne Cary Langhorne soon remarried, a member of another prominent Tidewater family, Benjamin Harrison III of Charles City County. Until John Langhorne III (1695-1767) reached his majority, the Harrison family operated Gambell plantation. For the next twenty years, John Langhorne would spend his days in the polite atmosphere of the Cary plantation.

      When in his early twenties however, John Langhorne III had become anxious for his own personal success. Thus in 1719, he took over Gambell and married Mary Beverley of Middlesex County. Mary Beverley was a granddaughter of Capt. John Langhorne's old friend and contemporary Maj. Robert Beverley. Throughout his long career, Hon. John Langhorne served as a Justice of the Peace, a member of the House of Burgesses, Sheriff of Warwick County, and Presiding Justice of Warwick County from 1749-1762. In addition to his numerous political duties, John Langhorne III continued to expand his land holdings by purchasing new plantations in Chesterfield County, and was also a highly successful merchant, continuing the tradition laid out by his fortune-founding grandfather some fifty years before. John Langhorne and Mary Beverley had three children who left issue. Their only daughter Lockey (named after Judith Lockey, the wife of Capt. Henry Cary and mother of Anne Cary) was successfully courted by Thomas Tabb. Lockey's considerable dowry helped to establish the Tabb family as members of the Tidewater elite. The elder son, Maj. Maurice Langhorne II (1719-1790) removed to Cumberland County to live near his cousin Col. Archibald Cary of "Ampthill" and his lovely wife, the former Mary Randolph of "Curles". This Maurice Langhorne bought thousands of acres in Cumberland and established himself as a great success in his own right.

      The younger son, Maj. William Langhorne (1721-1797) held possession of the Warwick County estates and became the most prominent of the three. He married Elizabeth Cary Scarsbrook, a cousin of George Washington and Thomas Nelson, and daughter of the wealthy Yorktown merchant Col. Henry Scarsbrook. Henry Scarsbrook was the great-grandson of Capt. Nicholas Martiau, the man whose plantation was later turned into Yorktown. Like his father, William Langhorne served as a Sheriff, Justice of the Peace, and as a Burgess. He was also a magistrate for forty years. During the Revolutionary War, William Langhorne served as aide-de-camp to the Marquis de Lafayette, was a member of the Committee of Safety, and was the only representative of Warwick County for the first four out of five Revolutionary Conventions. His service has been commemorated on a memorial in Williamsburg. Of his nine children, two sons were the most prominent. Maj. John Scarsbrook Langhorne (1760-1797) married the daughter of his Uncle Maj. Maurice Langhorne of Cumberland, thus reuniting two lines of family inheritance. Marrying of cousins, a common practice among the wealthy families of Virginia and other colonies likewise, helped to keep money in the family. John Scarsbrook Langhorne's younger brother, another Maurice Langhorne (1769-1818) married Martha Holladay of "Indian Fields", and their grandson Maurice Finney Langhorne married Lillian Isabelle Blair Polk, a close relative of President James K. Polk.