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1 Children of Catherine Newton and James Brent
1. Hugh Brent, b. Between 1728 and 1741, Christ Church Parish, Lancaster County, Virginia d. 7 Feb 1778, Lancaster County, Virginia - Probate (Age ~ 50 years)
2. Sarah Brent, b. Aft 1729, Lancaster County, Virginia
3. John Brent, b. Aft 1731, Lancaster County, Virginia
4. Lucy Brent, b. Aft 1733, Lancaster County, Virginia
5. Eleanor Brent, b. Abt 1734, Lancaster County, Virginia d. Aft 1765, Bedford County, Virginia (Age ~ 32 years)
6. Beheathland Brent, b. Abt 1740, Lancaster County, Virginia
7. Willoughby Brent, b. Aft 1742, Lancaster County, Virginia d. Feb 1777, Prince William County, Virginia (Age < 33 years)
8. Stokeley Brent, b. Aft 1743, Lancaster County, Virginia d. 17 Jun 1765, Lancaster County, Virginia - Probate (Age < 20 years) 
Family F5933
 
2 The map of Prince Edward County opposite this page can be used to approximate the location of Thomas' land. Prepared in 1820 by John Wood, a resident of Prince Edward County, the map shows notable landmarks in the county; these include churches, schools, and large homes. West of Buffalo River, near Fort Creek, is the notation, "W. Lindseys." According to the above deed, Thomas was a neighbor of William Lindsey, a member of the Virginia General Assembly from 1813 to 1817. If the square marked "W. Lindseys" designates William Lindsey's residence, then Thomas' land was very close to it. In 1808 Aaron Lindsey built a large house on site of Thomas' former homestead. A survey of Prince Edward County's historic structures, conducted in 1937 by the Works Projects Administration, describes "Haverhill":

1. SUBJECT: "Haverhill".
2. LOCATION: 3 miles south of Prospect, Virginia, on Route #133; thence 1 mile east on Route #657; thence 1 mile south on private road leading to house.
3. DATE [BUILT]: 1808.
4. OWNERS: In one of the [Prince Edward County] deeds we see that it was originally known as the east end of the Tredway farm, which dated back to 1774. The first record
we have is of one hundred and thirty-five acres bought of a Thompson in 1804 by Aaron Lindsey. Aaron Lindsey left it by will to his nephew Thomas Lindsey in 1826. Samuel Hunt 1855 to 1899 Wiley P. Gilliam 1899 to 1907, R. C. William 1907 to 1907 D. T. Hancock and wife 1907 to 1937, present owners.
5. DESCRIPTION: Located in a grove of a variety of trees, is this stately old frame mansion, consisting of a story and a half and basement built on top of the ground. The
chimney on the east side is immense, measuring aproximately four yards wide with height in proportion. The interior consists of six large rooms, one shed room and three halls. The upstairs rooms are half story but are large. The basement is well finished with floor and is used for living purposes as much as any other part of the house.
6. HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE: This was the east end of one of the oldest farms in Prince Edward County, and has been owned continuously by some of the most outstanding people of the community. The place is still in good repair and the owner has been offered a large sum for the hand-carved wainscoting in one of the rooms. Within two years of selling land in Prince Edward County, Thomas and his family had relocated to fifteen miles northeast of Russellville, Logan County, Kentucky. The November 7, 1806 issue of the Russellville Mirror contained a notice which informed Thomas and James that they should claim letters addressed to them at the Russellville post office. Thomas made his last will and testament, on February 9, 1810; it was recorded in Logan County Will Book A, pages 163-164: 
Thompson, Thomas (I13913)
 
3 Theodrick Carter, II and Anne Waddill were the parents of Nancy Waddill Carter. Anne Waddill was baptized January 24, 1713, according to the register of St. Peter's parish, which encompassed New Kent County. Her parents were William and Sarah Dennis Waddill. William was elected vestryman of St. Peter's, on June 1, 1704, and served in
this capacity for at least thirty-five years. The author James Branch Cabell,a descendant of John Waddill, discussed the Waddills in his book "The Majors and Their Marriages." Theodrick Carter and Anne Waddill lived for a time in New Kent County. According to the register of St. Peter's parish, their first child John was baptized on October 30, 1737. Theodrick appeared in the Amelia County tithables list of June 10, 1747 in John Nash's district (this area became part of Prince Edward County in 1754); he is absent from the list Nash compiled for the same district on June 10, 1745. He must therefore have migrated from New
Kent County to present-day Prince Edward County sometime between these two dates. Nancy was born June 15, 1749, probably at her father's estate "Hickory Hill" (also known as "Hickory Grove"). According to tradition, the house was built around 1750; however, it may have been built three years earlier, since we know that Theodrick was living in John Nash's tax district on June 10, 1747.
John Wood's 1820 map of Prince Edward County shows the location of Hickory Hill. Two miles west of Hampden-Sydney College is the notation "Capt. Carter's." Captain Carter was Samuel Carter, Nancy's brother. Samuel inherited Hickory Hill from his father in 1777. Destroyed by fire in 1933, Hickory Hill was described four years later in the Works Projects Administration survey of Prince Edward County homes: [Hickory Hill] was not a show place except for its splendid boxwood and cedar hedge and lovely gardens. It was a plain frame house, or rather two houses connected by a little square room. The first of these traditions says it was built in 1750, a story and a half with small rooms except for one large reception room, which was beautifully paneled, and with one side of carved oak. The other part of the house was built by William H. Venable, when he bought the plantation in 1853 from Edward Carter [Samuel's son]. Mr. Venable built a large, square, two-story frame building, with large rooms and ample halls. The many outbuildings around the mansion house made the place quite a little settlement. The large grove of hickories flanking it on the south gave the place its name.
Nancy's father was one of Prince Edward County's most prominent planters. He purchased 975 acres in old Amelia County on September 20, 1748, and bought and sold other parcels of land up to the time of his death. A member of the Anglican church, Theodrick offered 300 acres of land to St. Patrick's parish for its use as a glebe, or plot of land granted to the local clergyman as part of his benefice during his tenure of office.

Thomas and Nancy Thompson probably named their fourth child in honor of her brother, Samuel Carter. Samuel distinguished himself in the military, in politics, and as a businessman. A member of the 1st Virginia Regiment during the Revolutionary War, he and seven other officers were granted the honor of personally welcoming the Marquis de Lafayette during the great soldier and statesman's visit to Richmond in October, 1824 (Richmond Enquirer, October 29, 1824, page 3). Samuel at various times held the county offices of sheriff, magistrate, and coroner; in 1805-1806 he represented Prince Edward County in the Virginia Assembly. In the late 1790s he was a trustee of a company which improved navigation on the Appomattox River. Later, he became a charter trustee of the Junction Canal Company. In 1825 the company constructed a canal which linked the Appomattox and Little Roanoke rivers. John Wood's map of Prince Edward County shows Samuel's mill at the mid-point of this canal.  
Carter, Theodorick3 Jr. (I13974)
 
4 Theodrick Carter, II and Anne Waddill were the parents of Nancy Waddill Carter. Anne Waddill was baptized January 24, 1713, according to the register of St. Peter's parish, which encompassed New Kent County. Her parents were William and Sarah Dennis Waddill. William was elected vestryman of St. Peter's, on June 1, 1704, and served in
this capacity for at least thirty-five years. The author James Branch Cabell,a descendant of John Waddill, discussed the Waddills in his book "The Majors and Their Marriages." Theodrick Carter and Anne Waddill lived for a time in New Kent County. According to the register of St. Peter's parish, their first child John was baptized on October 30, 1737. Theodrick appeared in the Amelia County tithables list of June 10, 1747 in John Nash's district (this area became part of Prince Edward County in 1754); he is absent from the list Nash compiled for the same district on June 10, 1745. He must therefore have migrated from New
Kent County to present-day Prince Edward County sometime between these two dates. Nancy was born June 15, 1749, probably at her father's estate "Hickory Hill" (also known as "Hickory Grove"). According to tradition, the house was built around 1750; however, it may have been built three years earlier, since we know that Theodrick was living in John Nash's tax district on June 10, 1747.
John Wood's 1820 map of Prince Edward County shows the location of Hickory Hill. Two miles west of Hampden-Sydney College is the notation "Capt. Carter's." Captain Carter was Samuel Carter, Nancy's brother. Samuel inherited Hickory Hill from his father in 1777. Destroyed by fire in 1933, Hickory Hill was described four years later in the Works Projects Administration survey of Prince Edward County homes: [Hickory Hill] was not a show place except for its splendid boxwood and cedar hedge and lovely gardens. It was a plain frame house, or rather two houses connected by a little square room. The first of these traditions says it was built in 1750, a story and a half with small rooms except for one large reception room, which was beautifully paneled, and with one side of carved oak. The other part of the house was built by William H. Venable, when he bought the plantation in 1853 from Edward Carter [Samuel's son]. Mr. Venable built a large, square, two-story frame building, with large rooms and ample halls. The many outbuildings around the mansion house made the place quite a little settlement. The large grove of hickories flanking it on the south gave the place its name.
Nancy's father was one of Prince Edward County's most prominent planters. He purchased 975 acres in old Amelia County on September 20, 1748, and bought and sold other parcels of land up to the time of his death. A member of the Anglican church, Theodrick offered 300 acres of land to St. Patrick's parish for its use as a glebe, or plot of land granted to the local clergyman as part of his benefice during his tenure of office.
--PAGE 14--
Theodrick made his will on December 7, 1777. The executors of his estate were Nathaniel Venable and Francis Watkins, two of Prince Edward County's most respected citizens. Venable was a member of the Virginia Assembly in 1766-1768; three of his sons were educated at Princeton, and one served in the United States Congress. Venable lived at Slate Hill, now in the National Register of Historic Places. Watkins was deputy clerk of the Prince Edward County court from 1767 to 1783; he was appointed clerk in 1783, retiring from that office in 1823. His home was called "Poplar Hill." Venable and Watkins were also charter trustees of Hampden-Sydney College, founded in Prince Edward County in 1776.
The following is Theodrick Carter's will:
In the name of God, Amen: I Theodrick Carter of the Parish of Saint Patrick and County of Prince Edward being of perfect and sound mind and memory do make and ordain this to be my last will and testament in manner following.
First, I give unto my daughter Susannah Stubblefield and sons John, Theodrick and William Carter each one shilling sterling. I give and bequeath unto my son Richard Carter one negro man named Dick, and one feather bed and furniture to him and his heirs forever. I give and bequeath my daughter Nanny Waddill Thompson one negro girl named Tibb now in her possession, also two cows and calves to her and her heirs forever. I give and bequeath unto my son Waddill Carter that part of my lands within the following bounds, to begin at the cross branch at the road, to run a straight line by the grave yard to his own line, all the land below this line on the North side of said road, also one negro man named Tom to him and his heirs forever. I give and bequeath unto my daughter Molley Carter one negro girl named Agg and one negro girl named Nanny, also the mare I purchased of Col. Robert Lawson, her own saddle and bridle, one feather bed and furniture, four head of sheep and two cows, to her and her heirs forever. I give and bequeath unto my daughter Salley Carter one negro boy named Will and
one negro boy named Abraham, the sorrel mare I purchased of Charles Williamson, one feather bed and furniture, her own saddle and bridle, four head of sheep and two cows, to
her and her heirs forever. I give and bequeath unto my son Samuel Carter the remainder of the lands and plantation whereon I now live and the following negros, Moll and her child Neptune, also all and residue of my estate not hereinbefore particularly mentioned of what kind or nature
soever, except two-thirds of my pewter and the two negroes named Jack and Sarah, these two negroes Jack and Sarah I leave to my two daughters Molley and Salley for their support till they marry or die and then my son Samuel, and desire that my executors hereafter named may devide my pewter into three equal parts and allot to my son Samuel
and daughters Molley and Salley each and equal parts thereof, the estate herein willed to my son Samuel I give to him and his heirs forever, and it is my will that so long as my daughters Molley and Salley live single that they have the free use and liberty of their chamber in my dwelling house without the denial or interruption of my son Samuel. It is my further will that should my said son Samuel depart this life without leaving issue, in that case the lands herein willed to him and every part of my estate bequeathed.
--PAGE 15--
him, I give and bequeath unto my said two daughters Molley and Sally to be equally devided between them by my executors hereafter named unless my said two daughters
should agree on a division themselves, which estate I bequeath to them and their heirs forever, (should it so happen my son Samuel) It is my will that all the negroes I'm possessed of be continued on my plantation the next year to make a crop. Lastly I do constitute and appoint my son Waddill Carter and friends Nathaniel Venable and Francis Watkins Executors of this my last will and testament, hereby revoking and declaring void all other wills by me heretofore made. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this seventh day of December in the year of Christ one thousand seven hundred and seventy-seven.
Theo'd Carter
.
Thomas and Nancy Thompson probably named their fourth child in honor of her brother, Samuel Carter. Samuel distinguished himself in the military, in politics, and as a businessman. A member of the 1st Virginia Regiment during the Revolutionary War, he and seven other officers were granted the honor of personally welcoming the Marquis de Lafayette during the great soldier and statesman's visit to Richmond in October, 1824 (Richmond Enquirer, October 29, 1824, page 3). Samuel at various times held the county offices of sheriff, magistrate, and coroner; in 1805-1806 he represented Prince Edward County in the Virginia Assembly. In the late 1790s he was a trustee of a company which improved navigation on the Appomattox River. Later, he became a charter trustee of the Junction Canal Company. In 1825 the company constructed a canal which linked the Appomattox and Little Roanoke rivers. John Wood's map of Prince Edward County shows Samuel's mill at the mid-point of this canal.  
Carter, Nancy Waddill 'Nanny' (I13912)
 
5 Thomas Thompson and Nancy Waddill Carter had eight children, according to a Bible which, in the 1920s, was in the possession of Mrs. Octavia Gayden Tullis. The inside back cover of the Bible had this inscription: "Carter Thompson's Holy Bible, August 14th 1819." Carter Thompson was Mrs. Tullis' great-grandfather. The Bible record also listed Carter's children and the children of his father-in-law John Morton. In 1929 Mrs. Tullis sent three letters and a transcript of the Bible record to Dr. Joseph D. Eggleston, who she hoped could provide information about the Thompson and Morton families. Dr. Eggleston, a past president of Hampden-Sydney College, spent much of his life
investigating Prince Edward County's history. The letters exchanged by Mrs. Tullis and Dr. Eggleston are preserved in the manuscripts section of the Virginia Historical Society (Genealogical Papers of Dr. Joseph Dupuy Eggleston, Morton Family File). Their correspondence included the following information on Thomas Thompson's family:
Thomas Thompson was born August 13, 1740; his wife Nancy " " "June 15, 1749.
"Their children were
James Thompson born August 16, 1770
Carter " " April 12, 1773
Thomas " " Nov. 16, 1774
Samuel " " Feb. 23, 1777
Elizabeth " Jan. 19, 1779
William " " May 24, 1780
Nancy " " August 20, 1785
John C. " " July 26, 1791
From the few public records which mention Thomas it is possible to make inferences regarding his occupation and social position. The inventory of Thomas' estate included a "barrel manufactory"; he may therefore have been a cooper, or barrel maker. Like most Virginia farmers and many of his descendants, Thomas probably cultivated tobacco. The "plantation tools" listed in his inventory may have been used for this purpose. Thomas had a relatively large estate. His inventory listed thirteen slaves, a large number for western Kentucky in 1810. Of more than three hundred households on the 1811 Butler County tax list, only six had more than ten slaves. Also, that he married the daughter of Theodrick Carter, one of Prince Edward County's most prominent planters, suggests Thomas was a respected
member of his community. Thomas' nationality is not known. The tradition among many of his descendants is that the
Thompsons are Scot-Irish. The families with which Thomas and his children associated in Kentucky were overwhelmingly Scot-Irish, as were his neighbors in Prince Edward County. Some evidence, however, suggests that the Thompsons are English. Included in this category are statements made by one of Thomas' grandsons in the late 1800s and the fact that, before his marriage, Thomas probably lived in Amelia County, where persons of English descent far outnumbered Scot-Irish. The next sections of this chapter address the question of Thomas' national origins and provide additional details about his life in Virginia and Kentucky. Public records reveal nothing about the identity of Thomas' parents and little concerning his nationality. No pre-1800 Virginia wills provide the name of his father. In fact, no Virginia wills mention Thomas or his children. Cyrus Thompson wrote what may be the earliest surviving observations on Thomas' nationality. Born in 1819 in Cadiz, Kentucky, Cyrus was James Thompson's son. In a letter to his hometown newspaper, the Kentucky Telephone, dated December 20, 1889, Cyrus wrote that his father "was a native of Prince Edward County, Virginia, and of English extraction." In 1898 Cyrus wrote a letter to his great-niece Emma Bristow. It contained two pages of genealogical information, including the following references to his father and grandfather: "my Father was James Thompson a native of Prince Edward County Virginia and whose Father came from England." If Cyrus is correct, Thomas was English, and may have come alone to America. The
absence of references to him in Virginia wills could be easily explained: if Thomas' father died in England, his will would not have been recorded in Virginia. Of course, Cyrus may not have known his grandfather's country of origin or even his grandfather's name. He referred to Thomas by name in neither the letter to the Kentucky Telephone nor the letter to Emma Bristow. In any case, because he wrote about his grandfather earlier than anyone else, Cyrus is probably the most authoritative voice on the national origins of Thomas Thompson. 
Thompson, Thomas (I13913)
 
6 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F2528
 
7

Census, 1930, Pittsylvania Co., VA, Callands, family 56. 
Reynolds, Doris Magdaline "Tootsie" (I7379)
 
8

Census, 1930, Pittsylvania Co., VA, Callands, family 56. 
Reynolds, William Howard (I7373)
 
9 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Dellinger, David Andrew (I7342)
 
10 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Moses, Forrest Lee (I7224)
 

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